Food neophobia and the adoption of new food products

This source preferred by Nick Johns and Heather Hartwell

Authors: Johns, N., Edwards, J. and Hartwell, H.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/0034-6659.htm

Journal: Nutrition & Food Science

Volume: 41

Pages: 201-209

ISSN: 0034-6659

DOI: 10.1108/00346651111132475

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Authors: Johns, N., Edwards, J.S.A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: Nutrition and Food Science

Volume: 41

Issue: 3

Pages: 201-209

ISSN: 0034-6659

DOI: 10.1108/00346651111132475

Purpose: This research aims to explore the scope of the food neophobia scale (FNS) as a means of identifying classes of adopters in the market diffusion of new food products. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire incorporating the FNS, together with a number of demographics questions, was administered to 226 postgraduate students. Data from the questionnaire were analysed using t-testing, one-way analysis of variance, cluster and discriminant analysis. Findings: There were small differences between recently arrived and long-term residents, between men and women, and, more significantly, between Europeans and East Asians, although not between other groups. A two-cluster structure was revealed within the data which broadly conformed to the expected pattern of adopters, but did not provide a more precise discrimination. This suggests that the FNS is dichotomous rather than continuous. Practical implications: The FNS provides a potential tool for marketers of food products, but it would need to be used with other measures to identify all five classes of adopters. Originality/value: This study addresses a gap in current knowledge, since food neophobia and the FNS have not been considered before in the context of market diffusion of new food products. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

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