Workplace foodservice; perception of quality and trust

This source preferred by Ann Hemingway

Authors: Hartwell, H., Hemingway, A. and Chapleo, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23163/

Journal: APPETITE

Volume: 97

Pages: 169-175

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.12.006

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Price, S., Hartwell, H., Hemingway, A. and Chapleo, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23163/

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 97

Pages: 169-175

eISSN: 1095-8304

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.12.006

In settings such as workplaces there is a growing acceptance that the food provided has a significant impact on health and wellbeing. This is a captive environment where the overall contribution of the meal served could be an important element of the overall diet and represents an under researched area. Despite growing demand, little information is available; time pressure when making food choice alongside the challenge of understanding information provided can act as barriers for healthy selection and can also decrease confidence in the food system. We would also argue that the fundamental human right of informing consumers what they are eating is not currently being addressed and is underscored. This study used focus groups to explore criteria that motivate peoples' food choice in a workplace foodservice setting. Thematic analysis was applied to categorise data according to frequently occurring responses. Data were collected from four focus groups in Germany and the UK with a total of 23 participants. Although there is little expectation in the quality of food served in the workplace, respondents valued any transparency of information and the opportunity to socialise with other work colleagues. Criteria of importance were identified as: Value for money, Variety, Naturalness, Nutrition, Portion Size, Taste, Visual Appearance, Origin, Animal welfare, Environmental impact, Fair Trade and Organic. Gaining insight into these criteria can enable operators to meet the needs and expectations of their customers in order to increase confidence in the food provided and in addition signpost a healthier selection.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Price, S., Hartwell, H., Hemingway, A. and Chapleo, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23163/

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 97

Pages: 169-175

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.12.006

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. In settings such as workplaces there is a growing acceptance that the food provided has a significant impact on health and wellbeing. This is a captive environment where the overall contribution of the meal served could be an important element of the overall diet and represents an under researched area. Despite growing demand, little information is available; time pressure when making food choice alongside the challenge of understanding information provided can act as barriers for healthy selection and can also decrease confidence in the food system. We would also argue that the fundamental human right of informing consumers what they are eating is not currently being addressed and is underscored. This study used focus groups to explore criteria that motivate peoples' food choice in a workplace foodservice setting. Thematic analysis was applied to categorise data according to frequently occurring responses. Data were collected from four focus groups in Germany and the UK with a total of 23 participants. Although there is little expectation in the quality of food served in the workplace, respondents valued any transparency of information and the opportunity to socialise with other work colleagues. Criteria of importance were identified as: Value for money, Variety, Naturalness, Nutrition, Portion Size, Taste, Visual Appearance, Origin, Animal welfare, Environmental impact, Fair Trade and Organic. Gaining insight into these criteria can enable operators to meet the needs and expectations of their customers in order to increase confidence in the food provided and in addition signpost a healthier selection.

This source preferred by Heather Hartwell and Chris Chapleo

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Price, S., Hartwell, H., Hemingway, A. and Chapleo, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23163/

Journal: APPETITE

Volume: 97

Pages: 169-175

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.12.006

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Price, S., Hartwell, H., Hemingway, A. and Chapleo, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23163/

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 97

Pages: 169-175

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

In settings such as workplaces there is a growing acceptance that the food provided has a significant impact on health and wellbeing. This is a captive environment where the overall contribution of the meal served could be an important element of the overall diet and represents an under researched area. Despite growing demand, little information is available; time pressure when making food choice alongside the challenge of understanding information provided can act as barriers for healthy selection and can also decrease confidence in the food system. We would also argue that the fundamental human right of informing consumers what they are eating is not currently being addressed and is underscored. This study used focus groups to explore criteria that motivate peoples' food choice in a workplace foodservice setting. Thematic analysis was applied to categorise data according to frequently occurring responses. Data were collected from four focus groups in Germany and the UK with a total of 23 participants. Although there is little expectation in the quality of food served in the workplace, respondents valued any transparency of information and the opportunity to socialise with other work colleagues. Criteria of importance were identified as: Value for money, Variety, Naturalness, Nutrition, Portion Size, Taste, Visual Appearance, Origin, Animal welfare, Environmental impact, Fair Trade and Organic. Gaining insight into these criteria can enable operators to meet the needs and expectations of their customers in order to increase confidence in the food provided and in addition signpost a healthier selection.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:45 on September 21, 2017.