How and When Socially Entrepreneurial Nonprofit Organizations Benefit From Adopting Social Alliance Management Routines to Manage Social Alliances

This source preferred by Chris Chapleo

Authors: Liu, G., Ko, W. and Chapleo, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24924/

Journal: Journal of Business Ethics

Publisher: Springer Verlag (Germany)

ISSN: 1573-0697

Social alliance is defined as the collaboration between for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Building on the insights derived from the resource-based theory, we develop a conceptual framework to explain how socially entrepreneurial nonprofit organizations (SENPOs) can improve their social alliance performance by adopting strategic alliance management routines. We test our framework using the data collected from 203 UK-based SENPOs in the context of cause-related marketing campaign-derived social alliances. Our results confirm a positive relationship between social alliance management routines and social alliance performance. We also find that relational mechanisms, such as mutual trust, relational embeddedness, and relational commitment, mediate the relationship between social alliance management routines and social alliance performance. Moreover, our findings suggest that different types of social alliance motivation can influence the impact of social alliance management routines on different types of the relational mechanisms. In general, we demonstrate that SENPOs can benefit from adopting social alliance management routines and, in addition, highlight how and when the social alliance management routines-social alliance performance relationship might be shaped. Our study offers important academic and managerial implications, and points out future research directions.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:40 on November 22, 2017.