Seeking unmediated political information in a mediated environment: The uses and gratifications of political parties' e-newsletters

This source preferred by Darren Lilleker

Authors: Jackson, N. and Lilleker, D.

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a777649696~db=all~order=page

Journal: Information Communication & Society

Volume: 10

Pages: 242-264

ISSN: 1369-118X

DOI: 10.1080/13691180701307495

Political parties are increasingly attempting to communicate to sections of the electorate directly, in order to relay targeted messages. E-newsletters are one key communication mode that facilitates this strategy, and previous research indicates that these, like many communications using information and communication technology, offer much potential for the sender. This research focuses on the receiver, explicitly taking a uses and gratifications approach to understanding the function of e-newsletters for the UK electorate. Our findings suggest that the majority of receivers are committed party members who desire to receive information directly from the party that will help them in their campaigning and activist roles. There is, however, a minority of less-active, politically interested, subscribers who also use e-newsletters to aid their voter choice. The data suggest that e-newsletters are able to encourage subscribers to develop and build relationships with a political party, possibly becoming more active in their support than simply offering a vote at election times.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Jackson, N.A. and Lilleker, D.G.

Journal: Information Communication and Society

Volume: 10

Issue: 2

Pages: 242-264

eISSN: 1468-4462

ISSN: 1369-118X

DOI: 10.1080/13691180701307495

Political parties are increasingly attempting to communicate to sections of the electorate directly, in order to relay targeted messages. E-newsletters are one key communication mode that facilitates this strategy, and previous research indicates that these, like many communications using information and communication technology, offer much potential for the sender. This research focuses on the receiver, explicitly taking a uses and gratifications approach to understanding the function of e-newsletters for the UK electorate. Our findings suggest that the majority of receivers are committed party members who desire to receive information directly from the party that will help them in their campaigning and activist roles. There is, however, a minority of less-active, politically interested, subscribers who also use e-newsletters to aid their voter choice. The data suggest that e-newsletters are able to encourage subscribers to develop and build relationships with a political party, possibly becoming more active in their support than simply offering a vote at election times.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:40 on November 19, 2017.