The british labour party and the german democratic republic during the era of non-recognition, 1949–1973

This source preferred by Darren Lilleker

Authors: Berger, S. and Lilleker, D.

http://www.journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=109645

Journal: The Historical Journal

Volume: 45

Pages: 433-458

ISSN: 0018-246X

DOI: 10.1017/S0018246X02002443

The German Democratic Republic (GDR) became the focus of a recurrent and sometimes heated debate within the British Labour party before 1973. The official stance of the party followed an all-party consensus within parliament about the non-recognition of the second German state. Yet many on the left wing of the Labour party came, for various reasons, to perceive such an inflexible stance as governed not by reason but dictated by the West German government. Such ambivalence towards West Germany and the Adenauer government in particular led to ambiguities within the party's policy as a considerable minority, including some key figures within the party, offered alternative strategies for maintaining or improving relations with the GDR. The most radical alternative, official recognition of the GDR as a legal, political entity, was only propounded by a core of hard left campaigners both within and outside the party. This article examines why sections of the Labour left came to sympathize with the GDR and how successful it was in influencing official party policy during the whole period of non-recognition of the GDR between 1949 and 1973.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Berger, S. and Lilleker, D.G.

Journal: Historical Journal

Volume: 45

Issue: 2

Pages: 433-458

eISSN: 1469-5103

ISSN: 0018-246X

DOI: 10.1017/S0018246X02002443

The German Democratic Republic (GDR) became the focus of a recurrent and sometimes heated debate within the British Labour party before 1973. The official stance of the party followed an all-party consensus within parliament about the non-recognition of the second German state. Yet many on the left wing of the Labour party came, for various reasons, to perceive such an inflexible stance as governed not by reason but dictated by the West German government. Such ambivalence towards West Germany and the Adenauer government in particular led to ambiguities within the party's policy as a considerable minority, including some key figures within the party, offered alternative strategies for maintaining or improving relations with the GDR. The most radical alternative, official recognition of the GDR as a legal, political entity, was only propounded by a core of hard left campaigners both within and outside the party. This article examines why sections of the Labour left came to sympathize with the GDR and how successful it was in influencing official party policy during the whole period of non-recognition of the GDR between 1949 and 1973. © 2002, Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.

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