Representations of tourism transport problems in a rural destination

This source preferred by Janet Dickinson and Derek Robbins

Authors: Dickinson, J.E. and Robbins, D.K.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V9R-4S3G9GX-1&_user=1682380&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000011378&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1682380&md5=7e499a3c4772f49998ccccb74eb28a23

Journal: Tourism Management

Volume: 29

Pages: 1110-1121

ISSN: 0261-5177

DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2008.02.003

Within the tourism impacts literature, car travel is regularly cited as a main contributor in destination areas. This study questions the nature of the problem by analysing key stakeholders’ representations of the tourism transport problem and tourists’ travel behaviour at a rural tourism destination in the UK. Exploratory research involving in-depth interviews with residents identified a typical emphasis on local travel problems and identified tourist arrivals by car as a major contributor. Data compiled using travel diaries and a survey, however, revealed car-based visitors had fewer concerns. Problems were seen to be minor with little or no need to modify behaviour to cope in any way. Analysis suggests perceptions of problems are to a large extent context contingent and are socially constructed and reproduced with consequent implications for destination management.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Dickinson, J.E. and Robbins, D.

Journal: Tourism Management

Volume: 29

Issue: 6

Pages: 1110-1121

ISSN: 0261-5177

DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2008.02.003

Within the tourism impacts literature, car travel is regularly cited as a main contributor in destination areas. This study questions the nature of the problem by analysing key stakeholders' representations of the tourism transport problem and tourists' travel behaviour at a rural tourism destination in the UK. Exploratory research involving in-depth interviews with residents identified a typical emphasis on local travel problems and identified tourist arrivals by car as a major contributor. Data compiled using travel diaries and a survey, however, revealed car-based visitors had fewer concerns. Problems were seen to be minor with little or no need to modify behaviour to cope in any way. Analysis suggests perceptions of problems are to a large extent context contingent and are socially constructed and reproduced with consequent implications for destination management. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Dickinson, J.E. and Robbins, D.

Journal: TOURISM MANAGEMENT

Volume: 29

Issue: 6

Pages: 1110-1121

ISSN: 0261-5177

DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2008.02.003

The data on this page was last updated at 04:42 on September 20, 2017.