Cavitation damage observations within scroll expander lubrication systems

This source preferred by Mark Hadfield

Authors: Tzanakis, I., Hadfield, M. and Kotsovinos, N.

http://www.wessex.ac.uk/10-conferences/tribology-and-design-2010.html

Start date: 11 May 2010

Observations of cavitation damage within a lubricated compressor system is studied experimentally. Components from field studies are examined and in particular within high carbon materials operating within a refrigerant/oil environment. Typical experimental analysis is used to observe cavitation erosion features such as SEM, light-microscopy and light-interferometer. Bubble generation and properties are studied theoretically to characterise the wear mechanisms and provide a basis for predictive modelling.

An experimental test-rig is used to study bubble characteristics within fluids to compare the theoretical analysis and practical in-service results from the compressor system. Using an ultra-sonic methodology and high-speed camera techniques the bubbles are observed within the working fluids. Results from the experimental studies and theoretical analysis are presented with discussion concerning the bubble generation and cavitation erosion wear mechanisms.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Tzanakis, I., Hadfield, M., Georgoulas, A. and Kotsovinos, N.

Journal: WIT Transactions on Engineering Sciences

Volume: 66

Pages: 261-272

ISBN: 9781845644406

ISSN: 1743-3533

DOI: 10.2495/TD100221

Observations of cavitation damage within a lubricated expander system are studied experimentally. Typical experimental analysis is used to observe cavitation erosion features such as SEM, light-microscopy and lightinterferometer. An experimental test-rig is used to study bubble characteristics within fluids to compare the theoretical analysis and practical in-service results from the expander system. Using an ultra-sonic methodology and high-speed camera techniques the bubbles are observed within the working fluids. A 2D numerical simulation of the scroll was performed to explore the mechanism which generates scroll cavitation. It is found that the pressure is high enough to liquefy instantaneously part of the refrigerant close to the bottom boundary, creating conditions for the generation of cavitation bubbles within the liquefied refrigerant. This finding resolves the puzzle how the refrigerant which enters the scroll in gas phase produces cavitation. © 2010 WIT Press.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Tzanakis, I., Hadfield, M., Georgoulas, A. and Kotsovinos, N.

Journal: TRIBOLOGY AND DESIGN

Pages: 261-+

ISBN: 978-1-84564-440-6

DOI: 10.2495/TD100221

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 24, 2020.