Virtual Prototyping for Dynamically Reconfigurable Architectures using Dynamic Generic Mapping

Authors: Gibson, D., Vasilko, M. and Long, D.I.

Conference: VHDL International Users Forum Fall 1998

Abstract:

This paper presents a virtual prototyping methodology for Dynamically Reconfigurable (DR) FPGAs. The methodology is based around a library of VHDL image processing components and allows the rapid prototyping and algorithmic development of low-level image processing systems. For the effective modelling of dynamically reconfigurable designs a new technique named, Dynamic Generic Mapping is introduced. This method allows efficient representation of dynamic reconfiguration without needing any additional components to model the reconfiguration process. This gives the designer more flexibility in modelling dynamic configurations than other methodologies. Models created using this technique can then be simulated and targeted to a specific technology using the same code. This technique is demonstrated through the realisation of modules for a motion tracking system targeted to a DR environment, RIFLE-62.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/18251/

Source: Manual

Virtual Prototyping for Dynamically Reconfigurable Architectures using Dynamic Generic Mapping

Authors: Gibson, D., Vasilko, M. and Long, D.I.

Conference: VHDL International Users Forum Fall 1998

Abstract:

This paper presents a virtual prototyping methodology for Dynamically Reconfigurable (DR) FPGAs. The methodology is based around a library of VHDL image processing components and allows the rapid prototyping and algorithmic development of low-level image processing systems. For the effective modelling of dynamically reconfigurable designs a new technique named, Dynamic Generic Mapping is introduced. This method allows efficient representation of dynamic reconfiguration without needing any additional components to model the reconfiguration process. This gives the designer more flexibility in modelling dynamic configurations than other methodologies. Models created using this technique can then be simulated and targeted to a specific technology using the same code. This technique is demonstrated through the realisation of modules for a motion tracking system targeted to a DR environment, RIFLE-62.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/18251/

Source: BURO EPrints