Working through dialogue, phronesis & techne to develop judgement-based practice

Authors: Shaw, R., Rees, K., Galvin, K., Heath, G., McNeish, S. and Nosek, M.

Start date: 24 June 2018

This panel presentation will bring together an international group of academics who have been developing an interest in judgement based practice over the last 5-10 years. We will explore Polkinghorne’s judgement-based practice to examine the phenomena of phronesis and techne in contemporary healthcare practice. Rachel’s research with hospital-based nurses will examine clinical expertise manifesting as ‘automatic’ behaviour alongside the significance of ‘languaging’ – reflectively making sense of – acute life threatening events. Karen’s work on reflective practice among student nurses will develop the role of inner dialogue – self-reflection and moments where we discover ourselves within the intersubjective spaces of clinical work. Gemma’s presentation will further that notion of a health space, exploring how it facilitates or inhibits our ability to connect with patients and families; proposing ways we might use our phenomenological practice to create a place conducive to collective judgements. Kate will present her work on the humanising care framework, drawing on the notion of lifeworld-led care to promote a care environment cognisant of patients’ lifeworlds, which facilitates human relationships involving caring-for and caring-with. Susan will use her work with undergraduate nursing students engaging, through simulation, with clients for the first time within the clients’ ‘homespace’. Through dialogue, using phronesis and techne, the students begin to uncover the unique needs of the client, towards client empowerment. Marcianna’s study with nurses and formerly incarcerated adults observed an expanded sense of phronesis between groups, demonstrating the benefits of the Socratic dialectic as a way of making sense of others. Together, these studies reflect a shift toward non-epistemologic forms of knowledge within professional clinical training programmes. Furthermore, they illustrate the gains achieved by taking a phenomenological approach to these questions.

Authors: Rachel, S., Kate, G., Susan, M., Marcianna, N. and Karen, R.

Start date: 24 June 2018

This panel presentation will bring together an international group of academics who have been developing an interest in judgement based practice over the last 5-10 years. We will explore Polkinghorne’s judgement-based practice to examine the phenomena of phronesis and techne in contemporary healthcare practice. Rachel’s research with hospital-based nurses will examine clinical expertise manifesting as ‘automatic’ behaviour alongside the significance of ‘languaging’ – reflectively making sense of – acute life threatening events. Karen’s work on reflective practice among student nurses will develop the role of inner dialogue – self-reflection and moments where we discover ourselves within the intersubjective spaces of clinical work. Gemma’s presentation will further that notion of a health space, exploring how it facilitates or inhibits our ability to connect with patients and families; proposing ways we might use our phenomenological practice to create a place conducive to collective judgements. Kate will present her work on the humanising care framework, drawing on the notion of lifeworld-led care to promote a care environment cognisant of patients’ lifeworlds, which facilitates human relationships involving caring-for and caring-with. Susan will use her work with undergraduate nursing students engaging, through simulation, with clients for the first time within the clients’ ‘homespace’. Through dialogue, using phronesis and techne, the students begin to uncover the unique needs of the client, towards client empowerment. Marcianna’s study with nurses and formerly incarcerated adults observed an expanded sense of phronesis between groups, demonstrating the benefits of the Socratic dialectic as a way of making sense of others. Together, these studies reflect a shift toward non-epistemologic forms of knowledge within professional clinical training programmes. Furthermore, they illustrate the gains achieved by taking a phenomenological approach to these questions.

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