Retrospective kinematic analysis of intervertebral stability in 10 patients with lytic spondylolisthesis

Authors: Breen, A. and Haig, L.

Start date: 1 November 2019

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent purpose of this study was to determine the extent which a group of patients with back pain and lytic spondylolisthesis had instability at the affected intervertebral motion segment.

Methods: The motion data of ten back pain patients (F4, M6, age 20-57 ), were identified as having lytic spondylolistheses (Figure), were reviewed. These patients had received sagittal plane passive recumbent flexion Quantitative Fluoroscopic examinations through 40 dsegrees using a Siemens using a Siemens Arcadis Avantic C-arm fluoroscope (Figure). The stability of the affected levels were measured as: Translation , Laxity and Motion Sharing and Motion Sharing Inequality (MSI) 1.

Results Results : No patients exceeded the upper reference limits for Translation , Laxity or MSI at the spondylolisthesis level (Table). Translation was related to grade of slip, albeit non-significantly (r=0.648 p=0.07).

Conclusions: In this spondylolisthesis population, no patient evidenced instability at the index level. There was a substantial, but non -significant relationship between degree of slip and translation range.

Implications: Patients with lytic spondylolisthesis should not be assumed to have instability if they present with back pain .

The data on this page was last updated at 05:31 on November 27, 2020.