'Violent' Deaths of Children in England and Wales and the Major Developed Countries 1974-2002: Possible Evidence of Improving Child Protection?

This source preferred by Colin Pritchard

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Sharples, A.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117950940/abstract

Journal: Child Abuse Review

Volume: 17

Pages: 297-312

ISSN: 0952-9136

DOI: 10.1002/car.1016

Child protection services are criticised for failing to prevent abuse but demonstrating successful prevention is impossible as it is trying to prove a negative. The alternative is to examine failures, i.e. the violent deaths of children (0-14 years) to indicate whether matters are improving or deteriorating. This paper uses the latest World Health Organisation data to compare children's violent deaths in England and Wales with those in other major developed countries. To account for possible hidden under-reported abuse deaths, undetermined, i.e. other external causes of death (OECD) and fatal accidents and adverse events (AAE), deaths are also analysed along with homicides, to compare all violence-related deaths between 1974-76 and 2000-02. England and Wales infant (<1 year) homicide rates were annually 57 per million but fell to 17 per million, a 74% fall. Infant AAE deaths fell in every country with England and Wales falling from 341 per million to 71 per million, a 76% reduction. Both these results were significantly better than those of eight other major developed countries, although England and Wales infant OECD at 26 per million, were high compared to the major developed countries. In the 1970s, combined violent deaths of all children (0-14 years) (homicide, OECD and AAE) in England and Wales were 203 per million, they are now 61 per million, a 70% decline with only Italy having lower rates. The worst rates were in the USA which had the highest combined violent death rate. These overall results in the major reductions of violence-related deaths in England and Wales can be a boost to the morale of front-line staff and provide the public with an indication of the progress being made.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Sharples, A.

Journal: Child Abuse Review

Volume: 17

Issue: 5

Pages: 297-312

eISSN: 1099-0852

ISSN: 0952-9136

DOI: 10.1002/car.1016

Child protection services are criticised for failing to prevent abuse but demonstrating successful prevention is impossible as it is trying to prove a 'negative'. The alternative is to examine 'failures', i.e. the 'violent' deaths of children (0-14 years) to indicate whether matters are improving or deteriorating. This paper uses the latest World Health Organisation data to compare children's 'violent' deaths in England and Wales with those in other major developed countries. To account for possible 'hidden' under-reported abuse deaths, undetermined, i.e. 'other external causes of death' (OECD) and fatal accidents and adverse events (AAE), deaths are also analysed along with homicides, to compare all 'violence-related' deaths between 1974 -76 and 2000-02. England and Wales infant (<1 year) homicide rates were annually 57 per million but fell to 17 per million, a 74% fall. Infant AAE deaths fell in every country with England and Wales falling from 341 per million to 71 per million, a 76% reduction. Both these results were significantly better than those of eight other major developed countries, although England and Wales infant OECD at 26 per million, were high compared to the major developed countries. In the 1970s, combined 'violent' deaths of all children (0-14 years) (homicide, OECD and AAE) in England and Wales were 203 per million, they are now 61 per million, a 70% decline with only Italy having lower rates. The worst rates were in the USA which had the highest combined 'violent' death rate. These overall results in the major reductions of 'violence-related' deaths in England and Wales can be a boost to the morale of front-line staff and provide the public with an indication of the progress being made. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Sharples, A.

Journal: CHILD ABUSE REVIEW

Volume: 17

Issue: 5

Pages: 297-312

ISSN: 0952-9136

DOI: 10.1002/car.1016

The data on this page was last updated at 04:51 on February 15, 2019.