Comparison of problematic behaviours of 10th and 11th year Southern English adolescents in 1985 and 2005. Part 1: Trends in gender behaviour.

This source preferred by Colin Pritchard

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Cox, M.

Journal: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Volume: 19

Pages: 127-140

ISSN: 0334-0139

To compare the problematic behaviours of 1985 adolescent 10th and 11th year students with that of 2005 pupils, and to examine current drink, drug and sexual activity. Method: Utilised a standardised questionnaire from 1985 and replicated the survey in broadly the same area in 2005. The study was self-administered and guaranteed anonymity for pupil and school, and was able to eliminate any bravado reporting. In 1985 it was not possible to inquire about sexual behaviour nor 'binge' drinking but this study was able to explore current respondents drink and sexual behaviour, utilising a linkage analysis to examine any drink-drug-sexual behaviour axis. Results: In 1985 males significantly smoked, truanted, fought, vandalised, stole and 'drugged' more than girls, but by 2005 females significantly smoked, drank, used cannabis more than boys. Current adolescent girls were more often were 'binge drinkers' (29%-15%) and sexually active than boys (23% to 11%). Amongst 10th year, 8% of boys and 16% of girls were actively sexually, by the 11th year it was 15% of boys and 31% of girls. Discussion: Over the 20 years the traditional differences in troublesome youth behaviour has changed, with girls behaving similar or worse than boys, which along with Binge Drinking and greater sexual activity, puts them at greater risk, which is a challenge to parents and services, nonetheless, the majority of young people do Not engage in these problematic behaviours.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Cox, M.

Journal: Int J Adolesc Med Health

Volume: 19

Issue: 2

Pages: 127-140

ISSN: 0334-0139

UNLABELLED: To compare the problematic behaviours of 1985 adolescent 10th and 11th year students with that of 2005 pupils, and to examine current drink, drug and sexual activity. METHOD: Utilised a standardised questionnaire from 1985 and replicated the survey in broadly the same area in 2005. The study was self-administered and guaranteed anonymity for pupil and school, and was able to eliminate any bravado reporting. In 1985 it was not possible to inquire about sexual behaviour nor 'binge' drinking but this study was able to explore current respondents drink and sexual behaviour, utilising a linkage analysis to examine any drink-drug-sexual behaviour axis. RESULTS: In 1985 males significantly smoked, truanted, fought, vandalised, stole and 'drugged' more than girls, but by 2005 females significantly smoked, drank, used cannabis more than boys. Current adolescent girls were more often were 'binge drinkers' (29%-15%) and sexually active than boys (23% to 11%). Amongst 10th year 8% of boys and 16% of girls were actively sexually, by the 11th year it was 15% of boys and 31% of girls. DISCUSSION: Over the 20 years the traditional differences in troublesome youth behaviour has changed, with girls behaving similar or worse than boys, which along with Binge Drinking and greater sexual activity, puts them at greater risk, which is a challenge to parents and services, nonetheless, the majority of young people do Not engage in these problematic behaviours.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Cox, M.

Journal: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Volume: 19

Issue: 2

Pages: 127-140

ISSN: 0334-0139

DOI: 10.1515/IJAMH.2007.19.2.127

To compare the problematic behaviours of 1985 adolescent 10th and 11th year students with that of 2005 pupils, and to examine current drink, drug and sexual activity. Method: Utilised a standardised questionnaire from 1985 and replicated the survey in broadly the same area in 2005. The study was self-administered and guaranteed anonymity for pupil and school, and was able to eliminate any bravado reporting. In 1985 it was not possible to inquire about sexual behaviour nor 'binge' drinking but this study was able to explore current respondents drink and sexual behaviour, utilising a linkage analysis to examine any drink-drug-sexual behaviour axis. Results: In 1985 males significantly smoked, truanted, fought, vandalised, stole and 'drugged' more than girls, but by 2005 females significantly smoked, drank, used cannabis more than boys. Current adolescent girls were more often were 'binge drinkers' (29%-15%) and sexually active than boys (23% to 11%). Amongst 10th year, 8% of boys and 16% of girls were actively sexually, by the 11th year it was 15% of boys and 31% of girls. Discussion: Over the 20 years the traditional differences in troublesome youth behaviour has changed, with girls behaving similar or worse than boys, which along with Binge Drinking and greater sexual activity, puts them at greater risk, which is a challenge to parents and services, nonetheless, the majority of young people do Not engage in these problematic behaviours. © Freund Publishing House Ltd.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Cox, M.

Journal: International journal of adolescent medicine and health

Volume: 19

Issue: 2

Pages: 127-140

ISSN: 0334-0139

UNLABELLED: To compare the problematic behaviours of 1985 adolescent 10th and 11th year students with that of 2005 pupils, and to examine current drink, drug and sexual activity. METHOD: Utilised a standardised questionnaire from 1985 and replicated the survey in broadly the same area in 2005. The study was self-administered and guaranteed anonymity for pupil and school, and was able to eliminate any bravado reporting. In 1985 it was not possible to inquire about sexual behaviour nor 'binge' drinking but this study was able to explore current respondents drink and sexual behaviour, utilising a linkage analysis to examine any drink-drug-sexual behaviour axis. RESULTS: In 1985 males significantly smoked, truanted, fought, vandalised, stole and 'drugged' more than girls, but by 2005 females significantly smoked, drank, used cannabis more than boys. Current adolescent girls were more often were 'binge drinkers' (29%-15%) and sexually active than boys (23% to 11%). Amongst 10th year 8% of boys and 16% of girls were actively sexually, by the 11th year it was 15% of boys and 31% of girls. DISCUSSION: Over the 20 years the traditional differences in troublesome youth behaviour has changed, with girls behaving similar or worse than boys, which along with Binge Drinking and greater sexual activity, puts them at greater risk, which is a challenge to parents and services, nonetheless, the majority of young people do Not engage in these problematic behaviours.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:51 on February 18, 2019.