Achieving normality: The key to status passage to motherhood after a caesarean section

This source preferred by Immy Holloway

Authors: Fenwick, S., Holloway, I. and Alexander, J.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 25

Pages: 554-563

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2007.10.002

Objective

to explore women's experiences of caesarean section.

Design

a qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Data were collected using unstructured, tape-recorded interviews which took place between 1999 and 2000.

Setting

the South West of England.

Participants

twenty-one women who had experienced a caesarean section—either by choice or of necessity—and who were first- or second-time mothers.

Findings

four main categories emerged: expectations and reality, being in control, feelings of failure as a woman and feeling different. These all linked to the core category of achieving normality. Women strove to achieve normality after having a caesarean section. If they did not gain this sense of normality, the status passage to motherhood appeared to be more difficult.

Implications for practice

it is important for health-care professionals to identify and acknowledge the emotional and physical needs of women who experience a caesarean section. Improving communication and support antenatally and postnatally may have positive benefits for maternal well-being.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Fenwick, S., Holloway, I. and Alexander, J.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 25

Issue: 5

Pages: 554-563

eISSN: 1532-3099

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2007.10.002

OBJECTIVE: to explore women's experiences of caesarean section. DESIGN: a qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Data were collected using unstructured, tape-recorded interviews which took place between 1999 and 2000. SETTING: the South West of England. PARTICIPANTS: twenty-one women who had experienced a caesarean section-either by choice or of necessity-and who were first- or second-time mothers. FINDINGS: four main categories emerged: expectations and reality, being in control, feelings of failure as a woman and feeling different. These all linked to the core category of achieving normality. Women strove to achieve normality after having a caesarean section. If they did not gain this sense of normality, the status passage to motherhood appeared to be more difficult. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: it is important for health-care professionals to identify and acknowledge the emotional and physical needs of women who experience a caesarean section. Improving communication and support antenatally and postnatally may have positive benefits for maternal well-being.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Fenwick, S., Holloway, I. and Alexander, J.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 25

Issue: 5

Pages: 554-563

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2007.10.002

Objective: to explore women's experiences of caesarean section. Design: a qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Data were collected using unstructured, tape-recorded interviews which took place between 1999 and 2000. Setting: the South West of England. Participants: twenty-one women who had experienced a caesarean section-either by choice or of necessity-and who were first- or second-time mothers. Findings: four main categories emerged: expectations and reality, being in control, feelings of failure as a woman and feeling different. These all linked to the core category of achieving normality. Women strove to achieve normality after having a caesarean section. If they did not gain this sense of normality, the status passage to motherhood appeared to be more difficult. Implications for practice: it is important for health-care professionals to identify and acknowledge the emotional and physical needs of women who experience a caesarean section. Improving communication and support antenatally and postnatally may have positive benefits for maternal well-being. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Fenwick, S., Holloway, I. and Alexander, J.

Journal: MIDWIFERY

Volume: 25

Issue: 5

Pages: 554-563

eISSN: 1532-3099

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2007.10.002

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Fenwick, S., Holloway, I. and Alexander, J.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 25

Issue: 5

Pages: 554-563

eISSN: 1532-3099

ISSN: 0266-6138

OBJECTIVE: to explore women's experiences of caesarean section. DESIGN: a qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Data were collected using unstructured, tape-recorded interviews which took place between 1999 and 2000. SETTING: the South West of England. PARTICIPANTS: twenty-one women who had experienced a caesarean section-either by choice or of necessity-and who were first- or second-time mothers. FINDINGS: four main categories emerged: expectations and reality, being in control, feelings of failure as a woman and feeling different. These all linked to the core category of achieving normality. Women strove to achieve normality after having a caesarean section. If they did not gain this sense of normality, the status passage to motherhood appeared to be more difficult. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: it is important for health-care professionals to identify and acknowledge the emotional and physical needs of women who experience a caesarean section. Improving communication and support antenatally and postnatally may have positive benefits for maternal well-being.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:53 on April 22, 2019.