Plate versus bulk trolley food service in a hospital: comparison of patients' satisfaction

This source preferred by Heather Hartwell

Authors: Hartwell, H., Edwards, J. and Beavis, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/12162/

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TB0-4N276B5-1&_user=1682380&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000011378&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1682380&md5=2200d994c7b6b9dc65df87c0e6860539

Journal: Nutrition

Volume: 23

Pages: 211-218

ISSN: 0899-9007

DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2006.12.005

Objective The aim of this research was to compare plate with bulk trolley food service in hospitals in terms of patient satisfaction. Key factors distinguishing satisfaction with each system would also be identified.

Methods A consumer opinion card (n = 180), concentrating on the quality indicators of core foods, was used to measure patient satisfaction and compare two systems of delivery, plate and trolley. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to build a model that would predict food service style on the basis of the food attributes measured. Further investigation used multinomial logistic regression to predict opinion for the assessment of each food attribute within food service style.

Results Results showed that the bulk trolley method of food distribution enables all foods to have a more acceptable texture, and for some foods (potato, P = 0.007; poached fish, P = 0.001; and minced beef, P ≤ 0.0005) temperature, and for other foods (broccoli, P ≤ 0.0005; carrots, P ≤ 0.0005; and poached fish, P = 0.001) flavor, than the plate system of delivery, where flavor is associated with bad opinion or dissatisfaction. A model was built indicating patient satisfaction with the two service systems.

Conclusion This research confirms that patient satisfaction is enhanced by choice at the point of consumption (trolley system); however, portion size was not the controlling dimension. Temperature and texture were the most important attributes that measure patient satisfaction with food, thus defining the focus for hospital food service managers. To date, a model predicting patient satisfaction with the quality of food as served has not been proposed, and as such this work adds to the body of knowledge in this field. This report brings new information about the service style of dishes for improving the quality of food and thus enhancing patient satisfaction.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hartwell, H.J., Edwards, J.S.A. and Beavis, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/12162/

Journal: Nutrition

Volume: 23

Issue: 3

Pages: 211-218

ISSN: 0899-9007

DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2006.12.005

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this research was to compare plate with bulk trolley food service in hospitals in terms of patient satisfaction. Key factors distinguishing satisfaction with each system would also be identified. METHODS: A consumer opinion card (n = 180), concentrating on the quality indicators of core foods, was used to measure patient satisfaction and compare two systems of delivery, plate and trolley. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to build a model that would predict food service style on the basis of the food attributes measured. Further investigation used multinomial logistic regression to predict opinion for the assessment of each food attribute within food service style. RESULTS: Results showed that the bulk trolley method of food distribution enables all foods to have a more acceptable texture, and for some foods (potato, P = 0.007; poached fish, P = 0.001; and minced beef, P < or = 0.0005) temperature, and for other foods (broccoli, P < or = 0.0005; carrots, P < or = 0.0005; and poached fish, P = 0.001) flavor, than the plate system of delivery, where flavor is associated with bad opinion or dissatisfaction. A model was built indicating patient satisfaction with the two service systems. CONCLUSION: This research confirms that patient satisfaction is enhanced by choice at the point of consumption (trolley system); however, portion size was not the controlling dimension. Temperature and texture were the most important attributes that measure patient satisfaction with food, thus defining the focus for hospital food service managers. To date, a model predicting patient satisfaction with the quality of food as served has not been proposed, and as such this work adds to the body of knowledge in this field. This report brings new information about the service style of dishes for improving the quality of food and thus enhancing patient satisfaction.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hartwell, H.J., Edwards, J.S.A. and Beavis, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/12162/

Journal: Nutrition

Volume: 23

Issue: 3

Pages: 211-218

ISSN: 0899-9007

DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2006.12.005

Objective: The aim of this research was to compare plate with bulk trolley food service in hospitals in terms of patient satisfaction. Key factors distinguishing satisfaction with each system would also be identified. Methods: A consumer opinion card (n = 180), concentrating on the quality indicators of core foods, was used to measure patient satisfaction and compare two systems of delivery, plate and trolley. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to build a model that would predict food service style on the basis of the food attributes measured. Further investigation used multinomial logistic regression to predict opinion for the assessment of each food attribute within food service style. Results: Results showed that the bulk trolley method of food distribution enables all foods to have a more acceptable texture, and for some foods (potato, P = 0.007; poached fish, P = 0.001; and minced beef, P ≤ 0.0005) temperature, and for other foods (broccoli, P ≤ 0.0005; carrots, P ≤ 0.0005; and poached fish, P = 0.001) flavor, than the plate system of delivery, where flavor is associated with bad opinion or dissatisfaction. A model was built indicating patient satisfaction with the two service systems. Conclusion: This research confirms that patient satisfaction is enhanced by choice at the point of consumption (trolley system); however, portion size was not the controlling dimension. Temperature and texture were the most important attributes that measure patient satisfaction with food, thus defining the focus for hospital food service managers. To date, a model predicting patient satisfaction with the quality of food as served has not been proposed, and as such this work adds to the body of knowledge in this field. This report brings new information about the service style of dishes for improving the quality of food and thus enhancing patient satisfaction. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hartwell, H.J., Edwards, J.S.A. and Beavis, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/12162/

Journal: NUTRITION

Volume: 23

Issue: 3

Pages: 211-218

ISSN: 0899-9007

DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2006.12.005

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hartwell, H.J., Edwards, J.S. and Beavis, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/12162/

Journal: Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.)

Volume: 23

Issue: 3

Pages: 211-218

eISSN: 1873-1244

ISSN: 0899-9007

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this research was to compare plate with bulk trolley food service in hospitals in terms of patient satisfaction. Key factors distinguishing satisfaction with each system would also be identified. METHODS: A consumer opinion card (n = 180), concentrating on the quality indicators of core foods, was used to measure patient satisfaction and compare two systems of delivery, plate and trolley. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to build a model that would predict food service style on the basis of the food attributes measured. Further investigation used multinomial logistic regression to predict opinion for the assessment of each food attribute within food service style. RESULTS: Results showed that the bulk trolley method of food distribution enables all foods to have a more acceptable texture, and for some foods (potato, P = 0.007; poached fish, P = 0.001; and minced beef, P < or = 0.0005) temperature, and for other foods (broccoli, P < or = 0.0005; carrots, P < or = 0.0005; and poached fish, P = 0.001) flavor, than the plate system of delivery, where flavor is associated with bad opinion or dissatisfaction. A model was built indicating patient satisfaction with the two service systems. CONCLUSION: This research confirms that patient satisfaction is enhanced by choice at the point of consumption (trolley system); however, portion size was not the controlling dimension. Temperature and texture were the most important attributes that measure patient satisfaction with food, thus defining the focus for hospital food service managers. To date, a model predicting patient satisfaction with the quality of food as served has not been proposed, and as such this work adds to the body of knowledge in this field. This report brings new information about the service style of dishes for improving the quality of food and thus enhancing patient satisfaction.

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