A systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions to prevent STI/HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

Authors: Paul-Ebhohimhen, V.A., Poobalan, A. and Van Teijlingen, E.R.

Journal: BMC Public Health

Volume: 8

eISSN: 1471-2458

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-4

Abstract:

Background. The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains of global significance and there is a need to target (a) the adolescent age-groups in which most new infections occur; and (b) sub-Saharan Africa where the greatest burden of the epidemic lies. A focused systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions in sub-Saharan Africa to prevent HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) in this age group was therefore conducted. Methods. Searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, Cinahl and PsychINFO according to agreed a priori criteria for studies published between 1986 and 2006. Further searches were conducted in UNAIDS and WHO (World Health Organization) websites, and 'Google'. Relevant journals were hand-searched and references cited in identified articles were followed up. Data extraction and quality assessment was carried out on studies selected for full text appraisal, and results were analysed and presented in narrative format. Results. Some 1,020 possible titles and abstracts were found, 23 full text articles were critically appraised, and 12 articles (10 studies) reviewed, reflecting the paucity of published studies conducted relative to the magnitude of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Knowledge and attitude-related outcomes were the most associated with statistically significant change. Behavioural intentions were more difficult to change and actual behaviour change was least likely to occur. Behaviour change in favour of abstinence and condom use appeared to be greatly influenced by pre-intervention sexual history. Conclusion. There is a great need in sub-Saharan Africa for well-evaluated and effective school-based sexual health interventions. © 2008 Paul-Ebhohimhen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16671/

Source: Scopus

A systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions to prevent STI/HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

Authors: Paul-Ebhohimhen, V.A., Poobalan, A. and van Teijlingen, E.R.

Journal: BMC Public Health

Volume: 8

Pages: 4

eISSN: 1471-2458

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-4

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains of global significance and there is a need to target (a) the adolescent age-groups in which most new infections occur; and (b) sub-Saharan Africa where the greatest burden of the epidemic lies. A focused systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions in sub-Saharan Africa to prevent HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) in this age group was therefore conducted. METHODS: Searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, Cinahl and PsychINFO according to agreed a priori criteria for studies published between 1986 and 2006. Further searches were conducted in UNAIDS and WHO (World Health Organization) websites, and 'Google'. Relevant journals were hand-searched and references cited in identified articles were followed up. Data extraction and quality assessment was carried out on studies selected for full text appraisal, and results were analysed and presented in narrative format. RESULTS: Some 1,020 possible titles and abstracts were found, 23 full text articles were critically appraised, and 12 articles (10 studies) reviewed, reflecting the paucity of published studies conducted relative to the magnitude of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Knowledge and attitude-related outcomes were the most associated with statistically significant change. Behavioural intentions were more difficult to change and actual behaviour change was least likely to occur. Behaviour change in favour of abstinence and condom use appeared to be greatly influenced by pre-intervention sexual history. CONCLUSION: There is a great need in sub-Saharan Africa for well-evaluated and effective school-based sexual health interventions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16671/

Source: PubMed

A systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions to prevent STI/HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

Authors: Paul-Ebhohimhen, V.A., Poobalan, A. and van Teijlingen, E.R.

Journal: BMC PUBLIC HEALTH

Volume: 8

ISSN: 1471-2458

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-4

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16671/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

A systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions to prevent STI/HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

Authors: Paul-Ebhohimhen, V.A., Poobalan, A.S. and van Teijlingen, E.

Journal: BMC Public Health

Volume: 8

ISSN: 1471-2458

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-4

Abstract:

Background

The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains of global significance and there is a need to target (a) the adolescent age-groups in which most new infections occur; and (b) sub-Saharan Africa where the greatest burden of the epidemic lies. A focused systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions in sub-Saharan Africa to prevent HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) in this age group was therefore conducted.

Methods

Searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, Cinahl and PsychINFO according to agreed a priori criteria for studies published between 1986 and 2006. Further searches were conducted in UNAIDS and WHO (World Health Organization) websites, and 'Google'. Relevant journals were hand-searched and references cited in identified articles were followed up.

Data extraction and quality assessment was carried out on studies selected for full text appraisal, and results were analysed and presented in narrative format.

Results

Some 1,020 possible titles and abstracts were found, 23 full text articles were critically appraised, and 12 articles (10 studies) reviewed, reflecting the paucity of published studies conducted relative to the magnitude of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Knowledge and attitude-related outcomes were the most associated with statistically significant change. Behavioural intentions were more difficult to change and actual behaviour change was least likely to occur. Behaviour change in favour of abstinence and condom use appeared to be greatly influenced by pre-intervention sexual history.

Conclusion

There is a great need in sub-Saharan Africa for well-evaluated and effective school-based sexual health interventions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16671/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Edwin van Teijlingen

A systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions to prevent STI/HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

Authors: Paul-Ebhohimhen, V.A., Poobalan, A. and van Teijlingen, E.R.

Journal: BMC public health

Volume: 8

Pages: 4

eISSN: 1471-2458

ISSN: 1471-2458

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-4

Abstract:

Background

The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains of global significance and there is a need to target (a) the adolescent age-groups in which most new infections occur; and (b) sub-Saharan Africa where the greatest burden of the epidemic lies. A focused systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions in sub-Saharan Africa to prevent HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) in this age group was therefore conducted.

Methods

Searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, Cinahl and PsychINFO according to agreed a priori criteria for studies published between 1986 and 2006. Further searches were conducted in UNAIDS and WHO (World Health Organization) websites, and 'Google'. Relevant journals were hand-searched and references cited in identified articles were followed up. Data extraction and quality assessment was carried out on studies selected for full text appraisal, and results were analysed and presented in narrative format.

Results

Some 1,020 possible titles and abstracts were found, 23 full text articles were critically appraised, and 12 articles (10 studies) reviewed, reflecting the paucity of published studies conducted relative to the magnitude of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Knowledge and attitude-related outcomes were the most associated with statistically significant change. Behavioural intentions were more difficult to change and actual behaviour change was least likely to occur. Behaviour change in favour of abstinence and condom use appeared to be greatly influenced by pre-intervention sexual history.

Conclusion

There is a great need in sub-Saharan Africa for well-evaluated and effective school-based sexual health interventions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16671/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

A systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions to prevent STI/HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

Authors: Paul-Ebhohimhen, V.A., Poobalan, A.S. and van Teijlingen, E.

Journal: BMC Public Health

Volume: 8

Issue: 4

ISSN: 1471-2458

Abstract:

Background

The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains of global significance and there is a need to target (a) the adolescent age-groups in which most new infections occur; and (b) sub-Saharan Africa where the greatest burden of the epidemic lies. A focused systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions in sub-Saharan Africa to prevent HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) in this age group was therefore conducted.

Methods

Searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, Cinahl and PsychINFO according to agreed a priori criteria for studies published between 1986 and 2006. Further searches were conducted in UNAIDS and WHO (World Health Organization) websites, and 'Google'. Relevant journals were hand-searched and references cited in identified articles were followed up.

Data extraction and quality assessment was carried out on studies selected for full text appraisal, and results were analysed and presented in narrative format.

Results

Some 1,020 possible titles and abstracts were found, 23 full text articles were critically appraised, and 12 articles (10 studies) reviewed, reflecting the paucity of published studies conducted relative to the magnitude of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Knowledge and attitude-related outcomes were the most associated with statistically significant change. Behavioural intentions were more difficult to change and actual behaviour change was least likely to occur. Behaviour change in favour of abstinence and condom use appeared to be greatly influenced by pre-intervention sexual history.

Conclusion

There is a great need in sub-Saharan Africa for well-evaluated and effective school-based sexual health interventions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16671/

Source: BURO EPrints