Factors associated with high risk of marginal hyperthermia in elderly patients living in an institution

This source preferred by Stephen Allen

Authors: Vassallo, M., Gera, K.N. and Allen, S.C.

Journal: Postgraduate Medical Journal

Volume: 71

Pages: 213-216

ISSN: 0032-5473

DOI: 10.1136/pgmj.71.834.213

The elderly, the very young, and the sick are known to be adversely affected by high environmental temperatures. In a retrospective open case-note review of 872 patients in a large institution during a hot summer we identified characteristics in the elderly that increase the risk of marginal hyperthermia. Women were more likely to be affected than men (25.6% vs 16.9%). We found an age-related increase in marginal hyperthermia, 15.7% of those below 60 years developed a hyperthermia compared to 18.9% in those between 70-79 years (non-significant), 28.3% in those between 80-89 years (p = 0.01) and 50% in those above 90 years (p < 0.01). There was also a direct relationship between the incidence of hyperthermia and the ambient temperature (29% in the warmer wards, compared to 17.2% in cooler ones; p < 0.01) and with the level of dependence (42.3% of the bedridden group, p < 0.01, and 20.4% of the semi-dependent, p < 0.01, compared to 11.1% of the mobile group). These factors were more significant as predictors of risk than the diagnosis. Identifying high risk patients early and taking appropriate measures to avoid hyperthermia and dehydration is important to try to decrease mortality during heatwaves.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Vassallo, M., Gera, K.N. and Allen, S.

Journal: Postgrad Med J

Volume: 71

Issue: 834

Pages: 213-216

ISSN: 0032-5473

DOI: 10.1136/pgmj.71.834.213

The elderly, the very young, and the sick are known to be adversely affected by high environmental temperatures. In a retrospective open case-note review of 872 patients in a large institution during a hot summer we identified characteristics in the elderly that increase the risk of marginal hyperthermia. Women were more likely to be affected than men (25.6% vs 16.9%). We found an age-related increase in marginal hyperthermia, 15.7% of those below 60 years developed a hyperthermia compared to 18.9% in those between 70-79 years (non-significant), 28.3% in those between 80-89 years (p = 0.01) and 50% in those above 90 years (p < 0.01). There was also a direct relationship between the incidence of hyperthermia and the ambient temperature (29% in the warmer wards, compared to 17.2% in cooler ones; p < 0.01) and with the level of dependence (42.3% of the bedridden group, p < 0.01, and 20.4% of the semi-dependent, p < 0.01, compared to 11.1% of the mobile group). These factors were more significant as predictors of risk than the diagnosis. Identifying high risk patients early and taking appropriate measures to avoid hyperthermia and dehydration is important to try to decrease mortality during heatwaves.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Vassallo, M., Gera, K.N. and Allen, S.

Journal: Postgraduate Medical Journal

Volume: 71

Issue: 834

Pages: 213-216

ISSN: 0032-5473

DOI: 10.1136/pgmj.71.834.213

The elderly, the very young, and the sick are known to be adversely affected by high environmental temperatures. In a retrospective open case-note review of 872 patients in a large institution during a hot summer we identified characteristics in the elderly that increase the risk of marginal hyperthermia. Women were more likely to be affected than men (25.6% vs 16.9%). We found an age-related increase in marginal hyperthermia, 15.7% of those below 60 years developed a hyperthermia compared to 18.9% in those between 70-79 years (non-significant), 28.3% in those between 80-89 years (p = 0.01) and 50% in those above 90 years (p<0.01). There was also a direct relationship between the incidence of hyperthermia and the ambient temperature (29% in the warmer wards, compared to 17.2% in cooler ones; p <0.01) and with the level of dependence (42.3% of the bedridden group, p < 0.01, and 20.4% of the semidependent, p < 0.01, compared to 11.1% of the mobile group). These factors were more significant as predictors of risk than the diagnosis. Identifying high risk patients early and taking appropriate measures to avoid hyperthermia and dehydration is important to try to decrease mortality during heatwaves.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: VASSALLO, M., GERA, K.N. and ALLEN, S.

Journal: POSTGRADUATE MEDICAL JOURNAL

Volume: 71

Issue: 834

Pages: 213-216

ISSN: 0032-5473

DOI: 10.1136/pgmj.71.834.213

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Vassallo, M., Gera, K.N. and Allen, S.

Journal: Postgraduate medical journal

Volume: 71

Issue: 834

Pages: 213-216

eISSN: 1469-0756

ISSN: 0032-5473

The elderly, the very young, and the sick are known to be adversely affected by high environmental temperatures. In a retrospective open case-note review of 872 patients in a large institution during a hot summer we identified characteristics in the elderly that increase the risk of marginal hyperthermia. Women were more likely to be affected than men (25.6% vs 16.9%). We found an age-related increase in marginal hyperthermia, 15.7% of those below 60 years developed a hyperthermia compared to 18.9% in those between 70-79 years (non-significant), 28.3% in those between 80-89 years (p = 0.01) and 50% in those above 90 years (p < 0.01). There was also a direct relationship between the incidence of hyperthermia and the ambient temperature (29% in the warmer wards, compared to 17.2% in cooler ones; p < 0.01) and with the level of dependence (42.3% of the bedridden group, p < 0.01, and 20.4% of the semi-dependent, p < 0.01, compared to 11.1% of the mobile group). These factors were more significant as predictors of risk than the diagnosis. Identifying high risk patients early and taking appropriate measures to avoid hyperthermia and dehydration is important to try to decrease mortality during heatwaves.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:18 on July 20, 2019.