Psychosocial impact of visual impairment in working-age adults

Authors: Nyman, S.R., Gosney, M.A. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: British Journal of Ophthalmology

Volume: 94

Issue: 11

Pages: 1427-1431

eISSN: 1468-2079

ISSN: 0007-1161

DOI: 10.1136/bjo.2009.164814

Abstract:

Aim: To review the evidence for the presence of lower levels of psychosocial well-being in working-age adults with visual impairment and for interventions to improve such levels of psychosocial well-being. Methods: Systematic review of quantitative studies published in English from 2001 to July 2008 that measured depression/mental health, anxiety, quality of life, social functioning or social support. Results: Included were 29 studies that measured one or more outcomes (N=52). Working-age adults with visual impairment were significantly more likely to report lower levels of mental health (mean difference=14.51/100), social functioning (MD=11.55/100) and quality of life. Studies regarding the prevalence of depressive symptoms produced inconsistent results but had methodological limitations. Conclusions: Future research is required into the prevalence of loneliness, anxiety and depression in adults with visual impairment, and to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for improving psychosocial well-being such as counselling, peer support and employment programmes.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/17041/

Source: Scopus

Psychosocial impact of visual impairment in working-age adults.

Authors: Nyman, S.R., Gosney, M.A. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: Br J Ophthalmol

Volume: 94

Issue: 11

Pages: 1427-1431

eISSN: 1468-2079

DOI: 10.1136/bjo.2009.164814

Abstract:

AIM: To review the evidence for the presence of lower levels of psychosocial well-being in working-age adults with visual impairment and for interventions to improve such levels of psychosocial well-being. METHODS: Systematic review of quantitative studies published in English from 2001 to July 2008 that measured depression/mental health, anxiety, quality of life, social functioning or social support. RESULTS: Included were 29 studies that measured one or more outcomes (N = 52). Working-age adults with visual impairment were significantly more likely to report lower levels of mental health (mean difference = 14.51/100), social functioning (MD = 11.55/100) and quality of life. Studies regarding the prevalence of depressive symptoms produced inconsistent results but had methodological limitations. CONCLUSIONS: Future research is required into the prevalence of loneliness, anxiety and depression in adults with visual impairment, and to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for improving psychosocial well-being such as counselling, peer support and employment programmes.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/17041/

Source: PubMed

Psychosocial impact of visual impairment in working-age adults

Authors: Nyman, S.R., Gosney, M.A. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: BRITISH JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY

Volume: 94

Issue: 11

Pages: 1427-1431

eISSN: 1468-2079

ISSN: 0007-1161

DOI: 10.1136/bjo.2009.164814

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/17041/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Psychosocial impact of vision loss in working age adults

Authors: Nyman, S.R., Gosney, M.A. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: British Journal of Ophthalmology

ISSN: 0007-1161

DOI: 10.1136/bjo.2009.164814

Abstract:

Aim: To review the evidence for the presence of lower levels of psychosocial well-being in working age adults with visual impairment, and for interventions to improve such levels of psychosocial well-being.

Methods: Systematic review of quantitative studies published in English from 2001 to July 2008 that measured: depression / mental health, anxiety, quality of life, social functioning, or social support.

Results: Included were 29 studies that measured one or more outcomes (n = 52). Working age adults with visual impairment were significantly more likely to report lower levels of mental health (mean difference [MD] = 14.51/100), social functioning (MD = 11.55/100), and quality of life. Studies regarding the prevalence of depressive symptoms produced inconsistent results but had methodological limitations.

Conclusions: Future research is required into the prevalence of loneliness, anxiety, and depression in adults with visual impairment, and to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for improving psychosocial well-being such as counselling, peer support, and employment programmes.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/17041/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Samuel Nyman

Psychosocial impact of visual impairment in working-age adults.

Authors: Nyman, S.R., Gosney, M.A. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: The British journal of ophthalmology

Volume: 94

Issue: 11

Pages: 1427-1431

eISSN: 1468-2079

ISSN: 0007-1161

DOI: 10.1136/bjo.2009.164814

Abstract:

Aim

To review the evidence for the presence of lower levels of psychosocial well-being in working-age adults with visual impairment and for interventions to improve such levels of psychosocial well-being.

Methods

Systematic review of quantitative studies published in English from 2001 to July 2008 that measured depression/mental health, anxiety, quality of life, social functioning or social support.

Results

Included were 29 studies that measured one or more outcomes (N = 52). Working-age adults with visual impairment were significantly more likely to report lower levels of mental health (mean difference = 14.51/100), social functioning (MD = 11.55/100) and quality of life. Studies regarding the prevalence of depressive symptoms produced inconsistent results but had methodological limitations.

Conclusions

Future research is required into the prevalence of loneliness, anxiety and depression in adults with visual impairment, and to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for improving psychosocial well-being such as counselling, peer support and employment programmes.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/17041/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Psychosocial impact of visual impairment in working-age adults

Authors: Nyman, S.R., Gosney, M.A. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: British Journal of Ophthalmology

Volume: 94

Issue: 11

Pages: 1427-1431

ISSN: 0007-1161

Abstract:

Aim: To review the evidence for the presence of lower levels of psychosocial well-being in working age adults with visual impairment, and for interventions to improve such levels of psychosocial well-being.

Methods: Systematic review of quantitative studies published in English from 2001 to July 2008 that measured depression/mental health, anxiety, quality of life, social functioning or social support.

Results: Included were 29 studies that measured one or more outcomes (N¼52). Working-age adults with visual impairment were significantly more likely to report lower levels of mental health (mean difference¼14.51/100), social functioning (MD¼11.55/100) and quality of life.

Studies regarding the prevalence of depressive symptoms produced inconsistent results but had methodological limitations.

Conclusions: Future research is required into the prevalence of loneliness, anxiety, and depression in adults with visual impairment, and to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for improving psychosocial well-being such as counselling, peer support, and employment programmes.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/17041/

http://bjo.bmj.com/content/94/11/1427

Source: BURO EPrints