Performing slow vital capacity in older people with and without cognitive impairment - is it useful?

This source preferred by Stephen Allen

Authors: Allen, S.C., Charlton, C., Backen, W., Warwick-Sanders, M. and Yeung, P.

Journal: Age and Ageing

Volume: 39

Pages: 588-591

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afq084

Background: most patients with moderate cognitive impairment are unable to perform forced spirometry. It has been suggested that slow vital capacity (SVC) is easier to perform than forced vital capacity (FVC) because it requires less understanding and co-ordination. We conducted a study to determine whether that assertion is correct.

Methods: we studied 83 inpatients, mean age 83 years (range 67–95, 51 female). They had measurements made of FVC, SVC and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The spirometry was conducted using the European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society standards.

Results: of the 83 subjects, 38 were able to do both FVC and SVC and 32 were unable to do either. The overall concordance was 84%. Twelve were able to do SVC but not FVC (eight due to excessive cough, two due to weakness and two had an MMSE < 24 with poor co-ordination). An inability to do neither FVC nor SVC was predicted by an MMSE < 24/30 (P < 0.0001) with a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 67%.

Conclusion: SVC is not a usable substitute for FVC for elderly patients with cognitive impairment but is of some utility for those who tend to cough. An MMSE < 24/30 is predictive of inability to perform FVC and SVC.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Allen, S.C., Charlton, C., Backen, W., Warwick-Sanders, M. and Yeung, P.

Journal: Age Ageing

Volume: 39

Issue: 5

Pages: 588-591

eISSN: 1468-2834

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afq084

BACKGROUND: most patients with moderate cognitive impairment are unable to perform forced spirometry. It has been suggested that slow vital capacity (SVC) is easier to perform than forced vital capacity (FVC) because it requires less understanding and co-ordination. We conducted a study to determine whether that assertion is correct. METHODS: we studied 83 inpatients, mean age 83 years (range 67-95, 51 female). They had measurements made of FVC, SVC and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The spirometry was conducted using the European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society standards. RESULTS: of the 83 subjects, 38 were able to do both FVC and SVC and 32 were unable to do either. The overall concordance was 84%. Twelve were able to do SVC but not FVC (eight due to excessive cough, two due to weakness and two had an MMSE < 24 with poor co-ordination). An inability to do neither FVC nor SVC was predicted by an MMSE < 24/30 (P < 0.0001) with a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 67%. CONCLUSION: SVC is not a usable substitute for FVC for elderly patients with cognitive impairment but is of some utility for those who tend to cough. An MMSE < 24/30 is predictive of inability to perform FVC and SVC.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Allen, S.C., Charlton, C., Backen, W., Warwick-Sanders, M. and Yeung, P.

Journal: Age and Ageing

Volume: 39

Issue: 5

Pages: 588-591

eISSN: 1468-2834

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afq084

Background: Most patients with moderate cognitive impairment are unable to perform forced spirometry. It has been suggested that slow vital capacity (SVC) is easier to perform than forced vital capacity (FVC) because it requires less understanding and co-ordination. We conducted a study to determine whether that assertion is correct. Methods: we studied 83 inpatients, mean age 83 years (range 67-95, 51 female). They had measurements made of FVC, SVC and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The spirometry was conducted using the European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society standards. Results: of the 83 subjects, 38 were able to do both FVC and SVC and 32 were unable to do either. The overall concordance was 84%. Twelve were able to do SVC but not FVC (eight due to excessive cough, two due to weakness and two had an MMSE <24 with poor co-ordination). An inability to do neither FVC nor SVC was predicted by an MMSE <24/30 (P < 0.0001) with a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 67%. Conclusion: SVC is not a usable substitute for FVC for elderly patients with cognitive impairment but is of some utility for those who tend to cough. An MMSE <24/30 is predictive of inability to perform FVC and SVC. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Allen, S.C., Charlton, C., Backen, W., Warwick-Sanders, M. and Yeung, P.

Journal: AGE AND AGEING

Volume: 39

Issue: 5

Pages: 588-591

eISSN: 1468-2834

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afq084

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Allen, S.C., Charlton, C., Backen, W., Warwick-Sanders, M. and Yeung, P.

Journal: Age and ageing

Volume: 39

Issue: 5

Pages: 588-591

eISSN: 1468-2834

ISSN: 0002-0729

BACKGROUND: most patients with moderate cognitive impairment are unable to perform forced spirometry. It has been suggested that slow vital capacity (SVC) is easier to perform than forced vital capacity (FVC) because it requires less understanding and co-ordination. We conducted a study to determine whether that assertion is correct. METHODS: we studied 83 inpatients, mean age 83 years (range 67-95, 51 female). They had measurements made of FVC, SVC and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The spirometry was conducted using the European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society standards. RESULTS: of the 83 subjects, 38 were able to do both FVC and SVC and 32 were unable to do either. The overall concordance was 84%. Twelve were able to do SVC but not FVC (eight due to excessive cough, two due to weakness and two had an MMSE < 24 with poor co-ordination). An inability to do neither FVC nor SVC was predicted by an MMSE < 24/30 (P < 0.0001) with a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 67%. CONCLUSION: SVC is not a usable substitute for FVC for elderly patients with cognitive impairment but is of some utility for those who tend to cough. An MMSE < 24/30 is predictive of inability to perform FVC and SVC.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:52 on April 20, 2019.