Emotional processing and panic

This source preferred by Roger Baker, Peter Thomas and Sarah Thomas

Authors: Baker, R., Holloway, J., Thomas, P., Thomas, S. and Owens, M.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B6V5W-4B0PPCD-1-1X&_cdi=5797&_user=1682380&_orig=search&_coverDate=11%2F30%2F2004&_sk=999579988&view=c&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkWz&md5=47e0231e1e767d4cb1e09a21a9d3dd03&ie=/sdarticle.pdf

Journal: Behaviour Research and Therapy

Volume: 42

Pages: 1271-1287

ISSN: 0005-7967

DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2003.09.002

In this paper Rachman’s concept of emotional processing was extended and a model highlighting the psychological operations underpinning processing was specified. Using this model, the aim was to investigate, by means of a questionnaire, whether patients with panic disorder (n ¼ 50) have more emotional processing difficulties than two samples of healthy controls (London, n ¼ 406; Aberdeen, n ¼ 125). The panic disorder group did have significantly more emotional processing difficulties than the control groups, showing a marked tendency to control feelings of anger, unhappiness and anxiety. Three emotional processing dimensions distinguished the panic from the control groups: greater control of emotional experiences (‘smothering’ or ‘bottling up’ emotions), greater awareness of feelings and more difficulties in labelling emotions. The authors hypothesise that emotional processing deficits act as a vulnerability factor for developing panic attacks.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Baker, R., Holloway, J., Thomas, P.W., Thomas, S. and Owens, M.

Journal: Behav Res Ther

Volume: 42

Issue: 11

Pages: 1271-1287

ISSN: 0005-7967

DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2003.09.002

In this paper Rachman's concept of emotional processing was extended and a model highlighting the psychological operations underpinning processing was specified. Using this model, the aim was to investigate, by means of a questionnaire, whether patients with panic disorder (n=50) have more emotional processing difficulties than two samples of healthy controls (London, n=406; Aberdeen, n=125). The panic disorder group did have significantly more emotional processing difficulties than the control groups, showing a marked tendency to control feelings of anger, unhappiness and anxiety. Three emotional processing dimensions distinguished the panic from the control groups: greater control of emotional experiences ('smothering' or 'bottling up' emotions), greater awareness of feelings and more difficulties in labelling emotions. The authors hypothesise that emotional processing deficits act as a vulnerability factor for developing panic attacks.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Baker, R., Holloway, J., Thomas, P.W., Thomas, S. and Owens, M.

Journal: Behaviour Research and Therapy

Volume: 42

Issue: 11

Pages: 1271-1287

ISSN: 0005-7967

DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2003.09.002

In this paper Rachman's concept of emotional processing was extended and a model highlighting the psychological operations underpinning processing was specified. Using this model, the aim was to investigate, by means of a questionnaire, whether patients with panic disorder (n=50) have more emotional processing difficulties than two samples of healthy controls (London, n=406; Aberdeen, n=125). The panic disorder group did have significantly more emotional processing difficulties than the control groups, showing a marked tendency to control feelings of anger, unhappiness and anxiety. Three emotional processing dimensions distinguished the panic from the control groups: greater control of emotional experiences ('smothering' or 'bottling up' emotions), greater awareness of feelings and more difficulties in labelling emotions. The authors hypothesise that emotional processing deficits act as a vulnerability factor for developing panic attacks. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Baker, R., Holloway, J., Thomas, P.W., Thomas, S. and Owens, M.

Journal: BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY

Volume: 42

Issue: 11

Pages: 1271-1287

ISSN: 0005-7967

DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.200309.002

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Baker, R., Holloway, J., Thomas, P.W., Thomas, S. and Owens, M.

Journal: Behaviour research and therapy

Volume: 42

Issue: 11

Pages: 1271-1287

eISSN: 1873-622X

ISSN: 0005-7967

In this paper Rachman's concept of emotional processing was extended and a model highlighting the psychological operations underpinning processing was specified. Using this model, the aim was to investigate, by means of a questionnaire, whether patients with panic disorder (n=50) have more emotional processing difficulties than two samples of healthy controls (London, n=406; Aberdeen, n=125). The panic disorder group did have significantly more emotional processing difficulties than the control groups, showing a marked tendency to control feelings of anger, unhappiness and anxiety. Three emotional processing dimensions distinguished the panic from the control groups: greater control of emotional experiences ('smothering' or 'bottling up' emotions), greater awareness of feelings and more difficulties in labelling emotions. The authors hypothesise that emotional processing deficits act as a vulnerability factor for developing panic attacks.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:55 on November 21, 2018.