A model of serious leisure identification: The case of football fandom

This source preferred by Ian Jones

Authors: Jones, I.

Journal: Leisure Studies

Volume: 19

Issue: 4

Pages: 283-298

DOI: 10.1080/02614360050118841

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Authors: Jones, I.

Journal: Leisure Studies

Volume: 19

Issue: 4

Pages: 283-298

eISSN: 1466-4496

ISSN: 0261-4367

DOI: 10.1080/02614360050118841

Stebbins (1992) has suggested that the ‘profit hypothesis’, whereby the perceived benefits of taking part in an activity exceed the perceived costs, can be used to explain continued engagement in serious leisure activities. This argument, however, fails to explain the continued participation in such activities where the costs to the individual seem to exceed the rewards. This paper adopts a social identity perspective to identify and demonstrate the role of four compensatory behaviours – in-group favouritism, out-group derogation, unrealistic optimism, and voice – in ensuring continued participation in serious leisure. Such behaviours are described in the context of one particular serious leisure activity – that of football fandom – to explain why engagement in such an apparently unrewarding activity is maintained. A model of serious leisure participation is presented based upon these behaviours. © 2000 Taylor © Francis Group, LLC.

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