Food safety issues and children's lunchboxes

Authors: Hudson, P.K. and Walley, H.

Journal: Perspectives in Public Health

Volume: 129

Issue: 2

Pages: 77-84

ISSN: 1757-9139

DOI: 10.1177/1757913908101607

Abstract:

Aim: Approximately 60% of school children in the UK eat packed lunches on a regular basis. While extensive research investigating the health and quality of food in these lunchboxes has been conducted, there is very little parallel research into food safety issues. This study set out to examine the food safety issues associated with the daily cycle of lunchbox use among primary school children. In particular, the role of the actual lunchbox as a potential vehicle of cross-contamination was investigated. Methods: Using a self-completion questionnaire, parental attitudes towards food safety and their awareness of key food safety issues were identified with respect to children's lunchboxes. Using a data logger, temperature measurements were taken of a typical lunchbox over a school term to provide information about the temperature profile throughout the daily cycle of use. A lunchtime observation study provided detail about individual lunchboxes, their visual cleanliness, the types of debris left by children and the microbiology of the lunchbox itself. Results: The study found that while the majority of parents were aware of the potential food safety risks associated with their child's lunchbox, they recognized that poor temperature control during the school day increased the food safety risks but they did not always take appropriate steps to manage this risk. Conclusions: Despite there being no direct evidence of immediate food safety risks from this study, temperature control was a key food safety issue. The method and frequency of cleaning were also highlighted as areas of particular concern. © Royal Society for Public Health 2009.

Source: Scopus

Food safety issues and children's lunchboxes.

Authors: Hudson, P.K. and Walley, H.

Journal: Perspect Public Health

Volume: 129

Issue: 2

Pages: 77-84

ISSN: 1757-9139

DOI: 10.1177/1757913908101607

Abstract:

AIM: Approximately 60% of school children in the U.K. eat packed lunches on a regular basis. While extensive research investigating the health and quality of food in these lunchboxes has been conducted, there is very little parallel research into food safety issues. This study set out to examine the food safety issues associated with the daily cycle of lunchbox use among primary school children. In particular, the role of the actual lunchbox as a potential vehicle of cross-contamination was investigated. METHODS: Using a self-completion questionnaire, parental attitudes towards food safety and their awareness of key food safety issues were identified with respect to children's lunchboxes. Using a data logger, temperature measurements were taken of a typical lunchbox over a school term to provide information about the temperature profile throughout the daily cycle of use. A lunchtime observation study provided detail about individual lunchboxes, their visual cleanliness, the types of debris left by children and the microbiology of the lunchbox itself. RESULTS: The study found that while the majority of parents were aware of the potential food safety risks associated with their child's lunchbox, they recognized that poor temperature control during the school day increased the food safety risks but they did not always take appropriate steps to manage this risk. CONCLUSIONS: Despite there being no direct evidence of immediate food safety risks from this study, temperature control was a key food safety issue. The method and frequency of cleaning were also highlighted as areas of particular concern.

Source: PubMed

Food safety issues and children's lunchboxes

Authors: Hudson, P. and Walley, H.

Journal: Perspectives in Public Health

Volume: 129

Pages: 77-84

DOI: 10.1177/1757913908101607

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Philippa Hudson

Food safety issues and children's lunchboxes.

Authors: Hudson, P.K. and Walley, H.

Journal: Perspectives in public health

Volume: 129

Issue: 2

Pages: 77-84

eISSN: 1757-9147

ISSN: 1757-9139

DOI: 10.1177/1757913908101607

Abstract:

Aim

Approximately 60% of school children in the U.K. eat packed lunches on a regular basis. While extensive research investigating the health and quality of food in these lunchboxes has been conducted, there is very little parallel research into food safety issues. This study set out to examine the food safety issues associated with the daily cycle of lunchbox use among primary school children. In particular, the role of the actual lunchbox as a potential vehicle of cross-contamination was investigated.

Methods

Using a self-completion questionnaire, parental attitudes towards food safety and their awareness of key food safety issues were identified with respect to children's lunchboxes. Using a data logger, temperature measurements were taken of a typical lunchbox over a school term to provide information about the temperature profile throughout the daily cycle of use. A lunchtime observation study provided detail about individual lunchboxes, their visual cleanliness, the types of debris left by children and the microbiology of the lunchbox itself.

Results

The study found that while the majority of parents were aware of the potential food safety risks associated with their child's lunchbox, they recognized that poor temperature control during the school day increased the food safety risks but they did not always take appropriate steps to manage this risk.

Conclusions

Despite there being no direct evidence of immediate food safety risks from this study, temperature control was a key food safety issue. The method and frequency of cleaning were also highlighted as areas of particular concern.

Source: Europe PubMed Central