Who Kills Children? Re-Examining the Evidence

This source preferred by Jill Davey and Richard Williams

Authors: Pritchard, C., Davey, J. and Williams, R.

Journal: The British Journal of Social Work

Volume: advanced access

Pages: 1-36

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcs051

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pritchard, C., Davey, J. and Williams, R.

Journal: British Journal of Social Work

Volume: 43

Issue: 7

Pages: 1403-1438

eISSN: 1468-263X

ISSN: 0045-3102

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcs051

Violent children's deaths have become a surrogate indicator of effective child protection but can those who kill children be better identified? A decade-long study of child homicide assailants (population of 2.5 million) is re-examined in the context of nineteen Western nations' child mortality rates and child-abuse-related deaths, correlated with four international measures of relative poverty, focusing on income inequality. Child mortality rates of the nineteen countries were ranked and correlated with levels of poverty. Child mortality and poverty strongly correlated but, unexpectedly, childabuse-related deaths did not. Child homicide assailants are extremely rare, but three distinct within-family assailant categories can be identified: mentally ill parents, mothers with a child on the Child Protection Register and men with previous convictions for violence. Mentally ill parents were the most frequent assailants, but violent men killed over five times the rate of mentally ill parents. The juxtaposed results indicate that the assailants' problems are essentially psycho-criminological, especially violence, rather than socio-economic, although poverty worsens most situations. Despite the dangers of 'false positives', children's services need to give greater weighting to the child protection-psychiatric-violence interface to assist front line staff in improving risk assessment and contribute to reducing the impact that parental mental illness can have on the child. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The British Association of Social Workers. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Pritchard, C., Davey, J. and Williams, R.

Journal: BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK

Volume: 43

Issue: 7

Pages: 1403-1438

eISSN: 1468-263X

ISSN: 0045-3102

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcs051

The data on this page was last updated at 04:51 on February 15, 2019.