The effects of spatial frequency overlap on face recognition

This source preferred by Changhong Liu

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Collin, C.A., Rainville, S.J. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform

Volume: 26

Issue: 3

Pages: 956-979

ISSN: 0096-1523

The effects of spatial frequency overlap between pairs of low-pass versus high-pass images on face recognition and matching were examined in 6 experiments. Overlap was defined as the range of spatial frequencies shared by a pair of filtered images. This factor was manipulated by processing image pairs with high-pass/low-pass filter pairs whose 50% cutoff points varied in their separation from one another. The effects of the center frequency of filter pairs were also investigated. In general, performance improved with greater overlap and higher center frequency. In control conditions, the image pairs were processed with identical filters and thus had complete overlap. Even severely filtered low-pass or high-pass images in these conditions produced superior performance. These results suggest that face recognition is more strongly affected by spatial frequency overlap than by the frequency content of the images.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Collin, C.A., Rainville, S.J.M. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Volume: 26

Issue: 3

Pages: 956-979

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.26.3.956

The effects of spatial frequency overlap between pairs of low-pass versus high-pass images on face recognition and matching were examined in 6 experiments. Overlap was defined as the range of spatial frequencies shared by a pair of filtered images. This factor was manipulated by processing image pairs with high-pass/low-pass filter pairs whose 50% cutoff points varied in their separation from one another. The effects of the center frequency of filter pairs were also investigated. In general, performance improved with greater overlap and higher center frequency. In control conditions, the image pairs were processed with identical filters and thus had complete overlap. Even severely filtered low-pass or high-pass images in these conditions produced superior performance. These results suggest that face recognition is more strongly affected by spatial frequency overlap than by the frequency content of the images.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Liu, C.H., Collin, C.A., Rainville, S.J.M. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE

Volume: 26

Issue: 3

Pages: 956-979

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037//0096-1523.26.3.956

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Collin, C.A., Rainville, S.J. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance

Volume: 26

Issue: 3

Pages: 956-979

eISSN: 1939-1277

ISSN: 0096-1523

The effects of spatial frequency overlap between pairs of low-pass versus high-pass images on face recognition and matching were examined in 6 experiments. Overlap was defined as the range of spatial frequencies shared by a pair of filtered images. This factor was manipulated by processing image pairs with high-pass/low-pass filter pairs whose 50% cutoff points varied in their separation from one another. The effects of the center frequency of filter pairs were also investigated. In general, performance improved with greater overlap and higher center frequency. In control conditions, the image pairs were processed with identical filters and thus had complete overlap. Even severely filtered low-pass or high-pass images in these conditions produced superior performance. These results suggest that face recognition is more strongly affected by spatial frequency overlap than by the frequency content of the images.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:58 on July 23, 2018.