Web-site-based tailored advice to promote strength and balance training: An experimental evaluation

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Yardley, L.

Journal: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Volume: 17

Issue: 2

Pages: 210-222

eISSN: 1543-267X

ISSN: 1063-8652

DOI: 10.1123/japa.17.2.210

Abstract:

This study evaluated a Web site providing tailored advice to encourage older people to undertake strength and balance training (SBT). Adults age 60-88 (N = 302) were randomized to read either generic advice or advice tailored to their self-perceived balance problems and activity preferences. Between-groups differences in attitudes toward SBT after reading the advice did not quite reach significance (p =.059), but the tailored group reported higher ratings than the generic group that the advice was personally relevant (p =.017) and that the activities would be good for them (p =.047). Within-groups differences in the tailored group showed that completing an action plan increased confidence in undertaking SBT (p =.006). These findings were supported by a meta-analysis that pooled the effect sizes with those of a previous study. Thus, a tailored Web site might be a cost-effective way of encouraging some older people to undertake SBT. © 2009 Human Kinetics, Inc.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16354/

Source: Scopus

Web-site-based tailored advice to promote strength and balance training: an experimental evaluation.

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Yardley, L.

Journal: J Aging Phys Act

Volume: 17

Issue: 2

Pages: 210-222

ISSN: 1063-8652

DOI: 10.1123/japa.17.2.210

Abstract:

This study evaluated a Web site providing tailored advice to encourage older people to undertake strength and balance training (SBT). Adults age 60-88 (N = 302) were randomized to read either generic advice or advice tailored to their self-perceived balance problems and activity preferences. Between-groups differences in attitudes toward SBT after reading the advice did not quite reach significance (p = .059), but the tailored group reported higher ratings than the generic group that the advice was personally relevant (p = .017) and that the activities would be good for them (p = .047). Within-groups differences in the tailored group showed that completing an action plan increased confidence in undertaking SBT (p = .006). These findings were supported by a meta-analysis that pooled the effect sizes with those of a previous study. Thus, a tailored Web site might be a cost-effective way of encouraging some older people to undertake SBT.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16354/

Source: PubMed

Web-Site-Based Tailored Advice to Promote Strength and Balance Training: An Experimental Evaluation

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Yardley, L.

Journal: JOURNAL OF AGING AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Volume: 17

Issue: 2

Pages: 210-222

ISSN: 1063-8652

DOI: 10.1123/japa.17.2.210

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16354/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Web-site-based tailored advice to promote strength and balance training: An experimental evaluation

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Yardley, L.

Journal: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Volume: 17

Pages: 210-222

ISSN: 1063-8652

Abstract:

This study evaluated a Web site providing tailored advice to encourage older people to undertake strength and balance training (SBT). Adults age 60–88 (N = 302) were randomized to read either generic advice or advice tailored to their self-perceived balance problems and activity preferences. Between-groups differences in attitudes toward SBT after reading the advice did not quite reach significance (p = .059), but the tailored group reported higher ratings than the generic group that the advice was personally relevant (p = .017) and that the activities would be good for them (p = .047). Within-groups differences in the tailored group showed that completing an action plan increased confidence in undertaking SBT (p = .006). These findings were supported by a meta-analysis that pooled the effect sizes with those of a previous study. Thus, a tailored Web site might be a cost-effective way of encouraging some older people to undertake SBT.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16354/

http://journals.humankinetics.com/japa-back-issues/JAPAVolume17Issue2April/WebSiteBasedTailoredAdvicetoPromoteStrengthandBalanceTrainingAnExperimentalEvaluation

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Samuel Nyman

Web-site-based tailored advice to promote strength and balance training: an experimental evaluation.

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Yardley, L.

Journal: Journal of aging and physical activity

Volume: 17

Issue: 2

Pages: 210-222

eISSN: 1543-267X

ISSN: 1063-8652

DOI: 10.1123/japa.17.2.210

Abstract:

This study evaluated a Web site providing tailored advice to encourage older people to undertake strength and balance training (SBT). Adults age 60-88 (N = 302) were randomized to read either generic advice or advice tailored to their self-perceived balance problems and activity preferences. Between-groups differences in attitudes toward SBT after reading the advice did not quite reach significance (p = .059), but the tailored group reported higher ratings than the generic group that the advice was personally relevant (p = .017) and that the activities would be good for them (p = .047). Within-groups differences in the tailored group showed that completing an action plan increased confidence in undertaking SBT (p = .006). These findings were supported by a meta-analysis that pooled the effect sizes with those of a previous study. Thus, a tailored Web site might be a cost-effective way of encouraging some older people to undertake SBT.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16354/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Web-site-based tailored advice to promote strength and balance training: An experimental evaluation

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Yardley, L.

Journal: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Volume: 17

Issue: 2

Pages: 210-222

ISSN: 1063-8652

Abstract:

This study evaluated a Web site providing tailored advice to encourage older people to undertake strength and balance training (SBT). Adults age 60–88 (N = 302) were randomized to read either generic advice or advice tailored to their self-perceived balance problems and activity preferences. Between-groups differences in attitudes toward SBT after reading the advice did not quite reach significance (p = .059), but the tailored group reported higher ratings than the generic group that the advice was personally relevant (p = .017) and that the activities would be good for them (p = .047). Within-groups differences in the tailored group showed that completing an action plan increased confidence in undertaking SBT (p = .006). These findings were supported by a meta-analysis that pooled the effect sizes with those of a previous study. Thus, a tailored Web site might be a cost-effective way of encouraging some older people to undertake SBT.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16354/

http://hk.humankinetics.com/japa/viewarticle.cfm?aid=16886

Source: BURO EPrints