Oxygen sensing drives predictable migrations in a microbial community

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Authors: Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.

Journal: Environmental Microbiology

Volume: 11

Pages: 81-85

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Environ Microbiol

Volume: 11

Issue: 1

Pages: 81-85

eISSN: 1462-2920

DOI: 10.1111/j.1462-2920.2008.01742.x

Oxygen sensing is widely practised by aerobic organisms ranging from bacteria to vertebrates, and a dominant oxygen-sensing mechanism may persist among all aerobes. We traced population migrations of 10 species of the larger aerobic ciliated protozoa living in lake sediment, and in the 15 m water column of Esthwaite Water in the English Lake District (UK). In so doing, we discovered that the character and dynamics of the lake sediment and water column were remarkably predictable in performance over a continuous period of almost 2 years. Increasing warming of the lake sediment, coupled with low oxygen tension, resulted in the emergence of aerobic ciliates out of the sediment and their migration into the water column. And with the annual collapse of thermal stratification in the water column, the whole annual cycle was repeated. In an unusual discovery, we found that particular ciliate species seemed to be 'linked' to other (functionally different) ciliate species partners via the ambient oxygen tension. The favoured hypothesis is that all ciliate species in a particular body-size range seek out a particular, preferred oxygen tension. If that is the case, the 'cement' providing the cohesion of the ciliate community might actually be the preferred oxygen tension. The principal aim of our study is to clarify the microbial migration itself, not the response of the different ciliate species to oxygen gradients once they have established themselves in the water column. The latter happens once the organisms have migrated out of the sediment together, driven by the ambient oxygen tension.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Environmental Microbiology

Volume: 11

Issue: 1

Pages: 81-85

eISSN: 1462-2920

ISSN: 1462-2912

DOI: 10.1111/j.1462-2920.2008.01742.x

Oxygen sensing is widely practised by aerobic organisms ranging from bacteria to vertebrates, and a dominant oxygen-sensing mechanism may persist among all aerobes. We traced population migrations of 10 species of the larger aerobic ciliated protozoa living in lake sediment, and in the 15 m water column of Esthwaite Water in the English Lake District (UK). In so doing, we discovered that the character and dynamics of the lake sediment and water column were remarkably predictable in performance over a continuous period of almost 2 years. Increasing warming of the lake sediment, coupled with low oxygen tension, resulted in the emergence of aerobic ciliates out of the sediment and their migration into the water column. And with the annual collapse of thermal stratification in the water column, the whole annual cycle was repeated. In an unusual discovery, we found that particular ciliate species seemed to be 'linked' to other (functionally different) ciliate species partners via the ambient oxygen tension. The favoured hypothesis is that all ciliate species in a particular body-size range seek out a particular, preferred oxygen tension. If that is the case, the 'cement' providing the cohesion of the ciliate community might actually be the preferred oxygen tension. The principal aim of our study is to clarify the microbial migration itself, not the response of the different ciliate species to oxygen gradients once they have established themselves in the water column. The latter happens once the organisms have migrated out of the sediment together, driven by the ambient oxygen tension. © 2008 The Authors.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY

Volume: 11

Issue: 1

Pages: 81-85

ISSN: 1462-2912

DOI: 10.1111/j.1462-2920.2008.01742.x

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Finlay, B.J. and Esteban, G.F.

Journal: Environmental microbiology

Volume: 11

Issue: 1

Pages: 81-85

eISSN: 1462-2920

ISSN: 1462-2912

Oxygen sensing is widely practised by aerobic organisms ranging from bacteria to vertebrates, and a dominant oxygen-sensing mechanism may persist among all aerobes. We traced population migrations of 10 species of the larger aerobic ciliated protozoa living in lake sediment, and in the 15 m water column of Esthwaite Water in the English Lake District (UK). In so doing, we discovered that the character and dynamics of the lake sediment and water column were remarkably predictable in performance over a continuous period of almost 2 years. Increasing warming of the lake sediment, coupled with low oxygen tension, resulted in the emergence of aerobic ciliates out of the sediment and their migration into the water column. And with the annual collapse of thermal stratification in the water column, the whole annual cycle was repeated. In an unusual discovery, we found that particular ciliate species seemed to be 'linked' to other (functionally different) ciliate species partners via the ambient oxygen tension. The favoured hypothesis is that all ciliate species in a particular body-size range seek out a particular, preferred oxygen tension. If that is the case, the 'cement' providing the cohesion of the ciliate community might actually be the preferred oxygen tension. The principal aim of our study is to clarify the microbial migration itself, not the response of the different ciliate species to oxygen gradients once they have established themselves in the water column. The latter happens once the organisms have migrated out of the sediment together, driven by the ambient oxygen tension.

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