What is event-led regeneration? are we confusing terminology or will london 2012 be the first games to truly benefit the local existing population?

Authors: Sadd, D.

Journal: Event Management

Volume: 13

Issue: 4

Pages: 265-275

ISSN: 1525-9951

DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12621081189112

Abstract:

When London won the bid to host the Games, the vision was underpinned by key themes, one of which was to leave a legacy of benefiting the community through regeneration. The regeneration of the Lower Lea Valley was promised to be for the direct benefit of everyone who lives and works there, involving significant social and economic advancement. However, Mace, Hall, and Gallent draw parallels through the previous urban regeneration projects in major cities and they argue that for regeneration to work it has to be for the benefit of the existing communities and not "new" communities who inhabit the area post the Games. Could this happen in East London and, despite Government plans, the developments lead to an extension of the Docklands renaissance, inhabited instead by mostly middle class workers? This article explores the difference between regeneration and gentrification in the context of London 2012 and other Olympic Games. Much of the published literature regarding London's legacy of urban regeneration has a positive slant, yet, through the analysis of documentation from previous Games and through in-depth interviews with key stakeholders, the research highlights a number of issues that London 2012 will need to address. © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16706/

Source: Scopus

What is event led regeneration? Are we confusing terminology or will London 2012 be the first Games to truly benefit the local existing population?

Authors: Sadd, D.

Journal: Event Management

Volume: 13

Pages: 265-275

ISSN: 1525-9951

DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12621081189112

Abstract:

The term regeneration means keeping the locality available for the same social classes and improving the infrastructure for their benefit, however examination of previous games including Barcelona 1992 and Sydney 2000 has shown evidence of renaissance, referring to ‘upgrading’ the social structure of the area. The property prices in both cities rose as a result of the hosting of the games for both home owners and renters thus changing the social structure of the areas in questions. This term, renaissance, was used by Mace et al, (2007) in their paper about the urban changes to east Manchester.

A further term called social rejuvenation is more appropriate because it implies an intervention in the continuing decline of as area without specifying for whom the improvements are intended thus allowing the market forces to determine the social makeup, and therefore avoiding accusations of letting the locals down through unfulfilled promises.

This paper examines in detail both Sydney 2000 and Barcelona 1996 Olympic Games organisers’ strategies in developing their cities in order to host their respective games and in doing so the effects these plans had on the demographic structure of the local populations. Lessons learned are then made into recommendations for London 2012 where already communities are being displaced and the social structure is in danger of changing, with the promised ‘regeneration’ of East London (ODA, 2005) therefore never materialising.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/16706/

http://www.cognizantcommunication.com/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Debbie Sadd