Experimental and analytical thermal study of PTFE composite sliding against high carbon steel as a function of the surface roughness, sliding velocity and applied load

This source preferred by Iakovos Tzanakis and Mark Hadfield

Authors: Tzanakis, I., Conte, M., Hadfield, M. and Stolarski, T.A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21969/

Journal: Wear

Volume: 303

Issue: 1-2

Pages: 154-168

DOI: 10.1016/j.wear.2013.02.011

This study investigates the contact temperatures caused by frictional heating of sliding parallel pairs. In this case the materials studied are a PTFE composite in contact with a high carbon steel plate. These materials are commonly used for industrial applications, in particular as the main contacting components within a scroll expander system. The expected contact temperature values are important to be quantified in order to predict failure mechanisms associated with excessive thermal effects caused by sliding friction. A rational and coherent interpretation of the thermal effects on the actual tribological contact is presented.Contact temperatures are monitored continuously using a high-precision infrared thermal imaging technique with a systematic variation in surface roughness of the high carbon steel material. These surface temperatures are investigated as a function of the friction coefficient, the sliding velocity and the applied load while the most influential parameter for the temperature rise is determined. Analytical results using conventional mathematical methodology are also produced. The analytical and experimental findings are then compared indicating interesting correlations within the macro- and micro-surface temperature regimes and the experimental conditions. Microscopic observations show that thermal effects can seriously affect fibers durability while transfer films formed across the steel counterpart can be beneficial for the operation of scroll systems under specific roughness and test conditions.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Tzanakis, I., Conte, M., Hadfield, M. and Stolarski, T.A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21969/

Journal: Wear

Volume: 303

Issue: 1-2

Pages: 154-168

ISSN: 0043-1648

DOI: 10.1016/j.wear.2013.02.011

This study investigates the contact temperatures caused by frictional heating of sliding parallel pairs. In this case the materials studied are a PTFE composite in contact with a high carbon steel plate. These materials are commonly used for industrial applications, in particular as the main contacting components within a scroll expander system. The expected contact temperature values are important to be quantified in order to predict failure mechanisms associated with excessive thermal effects caused by sliding friction. A rational and coherent interpretation of the thermal effects on the actual tribological contact is presented.Contact temperatures are monitored continuously using a high-precision infrared thermal imaging technique with a systematic variation in surface roughness of the high carbon steel material. These surface temperatures are investigated as a function of the friction coefficient, the sliding velocity and the applied load while the most influential parameter for the temperature rise is determined. Analytical results using conventional mathematical methodology are also produced. The analytical and experimental findings are then compared indicating interesting correlations within the macro- and micro-surface temperature regimes and the experimental conditions. Microscopic observations show that thermal effects can seriously affect fibers durability while transfer films formed across the steel counterpart can be beneficial for the operation of scroll systems under specific roughness and test conditions. © 2013.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Tzanakis, I., Conte, M., Hadfield, M. and Stolarski, T.A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21969/

Journal: WEAR

Volume: 303

Issue: 1-2

Pages: 154-168

eISSN: 1873-2577

ISSN: 0043-1648

DOI: 10.1016/j.wear.2013.02.011

The data on this page was last updated at 05:16 on April 4, 2020.