Token economy in a hospital rehabilitation system

This source preferred by Roger Baker

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Baker, R.

Journal: J Adv Nurs

Volume: 13

Issue: 5

Pages: 631-639

ISSN: 0309-2402

A ward-based token economy programme which formed one part of a larger rehabilitative service for long-stay psychiatric patients is described. The clinical effectiveness of the programme is examined by the use of various nursing, psychological and psychiatric assessments before and after the patients' treatment on the ward, and the progress of former patients is followed-up as they move to different parts of the rehabilitation service. Significant clinical gains in patients' psychiatric symptomatology and problem behaviour on the ward are reported, although there were indications that improvement was not fully maintained as the patients moved on to other parts of the service. Comparison of the present clinical programme with the earlier research programmes on the ward indicated that the present regime was superior. The advantages and problems of token economy as a rehabilitative facility are discussed, outlining the various different roles for token economy with psychiatric rehabilitation. Finally, the future of token economy for long-stay patients is considered, questioning whether it might more appropriately be replaced by other structured ward programmes.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Baker, R.

Journal: Journal of Advanced Nursing

Volume: 13

Issue: 5

Pages: 631-639

eISSN: 1365-2648

ISSN: 0309-2402

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.1988.tb01457.x

A ward‐based token economy programme which formed one part ofa larger rehabilitative serviee for long‐stay psychiatric patients is described. The elinical effectiveness ofthe programme is examined by the use of various nursing, psychological and psychiatric assessments before and after the patients' treatment on the ward, and the progress of former patients is foliowed‐up as they move to different parts ofthe rehabilitation service. Significant clinical gains in patients' psychiatric symptomatology and problem behaviour on the ward are reported, although there were indications that improvement was not fully maintained as the patients moved on to other parts ofthe service. Comparison ofthe present clinical programme with the earlier research programmes on the ward indicated that the present regime was superior. The advantages and problems of token economy as a rehabilitative facility are discussed, outlining the various different roles for token economy with psychiatric rehabilitation. Finally, the future of token economy for long‐stay patients is considered, questioning whether it might more appropriately be replaced by other structured ward programmes. Copyright © 1988, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Baker, R.

Journal: Journal of advanced nursing

Volume: 13

Issue: 5

Pages: 631-639

eISSN: 1365-2648

ISSN: 0309-2402

A ward-based token economy programme which formed one part of a larger rehabilitative service for long-stay psychiatric patients is described. The clinical effectiveness of the programme is examined by the use of various nursing, psychological and psychiatric assessments before and after the patients' treatment on the ward, and the progress of former patients is followed-up as they move to different parts of the rehabilitation service. Significant clinical gains in patients' psychiatric symptomatology and problem behaviour on the ward are reported, although there were indications that improvement was not fully maintained as the patients moved on to other parts of the service. Comparison of the present clinical programme with the earlier research programmes on the ward indicated that the present regime was superior. The advantages and problems of token economy as a rehabilitative facility are discussed, outlining the various different roles for token economy with psychiatric rehabilitation. Finally, the future of token economy for long-stay patients is considered, questioning whether it might more appropriately be replaced by other structured ward programmes.

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