Quantifying shoreline changes along the Sefton coast (UK) and the implications for research-informed coastal management

This source preferred by Luciana Esteves

Authors: Esteve, L.S., Williams, J.J., Nock, A. and Lymbery, G.

Editors: da Silva, C.P.

http://www.cerf-jcr.org/images/stories/602.606_L.S.Esteves_ICS2009.pdf

Journal: Journal of Coastal Research: an international forum for the littoral sciences

Volume: SI 56

Pages: 602-606

eISSN: 1551-5036

ISSN: 0749-0208

The Sefton coast is a 36-km long coastline located between the Mersey and the Ribble estuaries in northwest England. It encompasses the longest coastal dune system in England and Wales, which has been rapidly eroding in the last century. The arcuate shape of this coast favours erosion at the prominent shore of Formby Point from where sediment diverges and is transported longshore promoting accretion northwards and southwards. This study aims to assess how different ways of estimating shoreline change rates (using different proxies and statistical methods) can affect future predictions of shoreline positions. Coastline and high water line positions, dune toe surveys and beach profiles spanning different time frames are analysed. Shoreline change rates are highly dependent on the proxy used to map the shoreline and the statistical methods used to estimate rates of changes. Generic models to predict future positions of the shoreline do not produce good results for this study area. Therefore, the analysis of long-term and a regular monitoring of various shoreline proxies are the best alternative for predicting future shoreline positions. An improved understanding of the past and present patterns of shoreline changes at different spatial and time scales is necessary to support best management practices taking into account scenarios of climate change.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Esteves, L.S., Williams, J.J., Nock, A. and Lymbery, G.

Journal: Journal of Coastal Research

Issue: SPEC. ISSUE 56

Pages: 602-606

eISSN: 1551-5036

ISSN: 0749-0208

The Sefton coast is a 36-km long coastline located between the Mersey and the Ribble estuaries in northwest England. It encompasses the longest coastal dune system in England and Wales, which has been rapidly eroding in the last century. The arcuate shape of this coast favours erosion at the prominent shore of Formby Point from where sediment diverges and is transported longshore promoting accretion northwards and southwards. This study aims to assess how different ways of estimating shoreline change rates (using different proxies and statistical methods) can affect future predictions of shoreline positions. Coastline and high water line positions, dune toe surveys and beach profiles spanning different time frames are analysed. Shoreline change rates are highly dependent on the proxy used to map the shoreline and the statistical methods used to estimate rates of changes. Generic models to predict future positions of the shoreline do not produce good results for this study area. Therefore, the analysis of long-term and a regular monitoring of various shoreline proxies are the best alternative for predicting future shoreline positions. An improved understanding of the past and present patterns of shoreline changes at different spatial and time scales is necessary to support best management practices taking into account scenarios of climate change.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Esteves, L.S., Williams, J.J., Nock, A. and Lymbery, G.

Journal: JOURNAL OF COASTAL RESEARCH

Pages: 602-606

eISSN: 1551-5036

ISSN: 0749-0208

The data on this page was last updated at 05:10 on February 17, 2020.