Ionizing radiation exposure and the development of intervertebral disc degeneration - No case to answer

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Mellor, F.E. and Breen, A.C.

Journal: Spine J

Volume: 13

Issue: 3

Pages: 224-226

eISSN: 1878-1632

DOI: 10.1016/j.spinee.2012.07.039

In the following perspective article, Mellor and Breen provide a counterpoint to a previous perspective on the potential link between ionizing radiation exposure and intervertebral disc degeneration in humans [1]. The previous perspective asked, is this link a myth or reality? It suggested the potential for such a link. Mellor and Breen offer a drastically alternate view, in essence, that the question itself is flawed. To support their perspective, they explain the different units of radiation measurement and their conversion to risk in humans and how this impacts the previous perspective. They explain the variable sensitivity of different body tissues to radiation and highlight that neither human research nor any of the multiple international regulatory agencies have ever suggested that the intervertebral disc is sensitive to radiation. Finally, they claim that it is impossible to predict with any certainty the effects of low-level radiation on the intervertebral discs.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Mellor, F.E. and Breen, A.C.

Journal: Spine Journal

Volume: 13

Issue: 3

Pages: 224-226

eISSN: 1878-1632

ISSN: 1529-9430

DOI: 10.1016/j.spinee.2012.07.039

In the following perspective article, Mellor and Breen provide a counterpoint to a previous perspective on the potential link between ionizing radiation exposure and intervertebral disc degeneration in humans [1]. The previous perspective asked, is this link a myth or reality? It suggested the potential for such a link. Mellor and Breen offer a drastically alternate view, in essence, that the question itself is flawed. To support their perspective, they explain the different units of radiation measurement and their conversion to risk in humans and how this impacts the previous perspective. They explain the variable sensitivity of different body tissues to radiation and highlight that neither human research nor any of the multiple international regulatory agencies have ever suggested that the intervertebral disc is sensitive to radiation. Finally, they claim that it is impossible to predict with any certainty the effects of low-level radiation on the intervertebral discs.© 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Mellor, F.E. and Breen, A.C.

Journal: SPINE JOURNAL

Volume: 13

Issue: 3

Pages: 224-226

eISSN: 1878-1632

ISSN: 1529-9430

DOI: 10.1016/j.spinee.2012.07.039

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Mellor, F.E. and Breen, A.C.

Journal: The spine journal : official journal of the North American Spine Society

Volume: 13

Issue: 3

Pages: 224-226

eISSN: 1878-1632

ISSN: 1529-9430

In the following perspective article, Mellor and Breen provide a counterpoint to a previous perspective on the potential link between ionizing radiation exposure and intervertebral disc degeneration in humans [1]. The previous perspective asked, is this link a myth or reality? It suggested the potential for such a link. Mellor and Breen offer a drastically alternate view, in essence, that the question itself is flawed. To support their perspective, they explain the different units of radiation measurement and their conversion to risk in humans and how this impacts the previous perspective. They explain the variable sensitivity of different body tissues to radiation and highlight that neither human research nor any of the multiple international regulatory agencies have ever suggested that the intervertebral disc is sensitive to radiation. Finally, they claim that it is impossible to predict with any certainty the effects of low-level radiation on the intervertebral discs.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:31 on November 27, 2020.