On the processing of canonical word order during eye fixations in reading: Do readers process transposed word previews?

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Rayner, K., Angele, B., Schotter, E.R. and Bicknell, K.

Journal: Vis cogn

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 353-381

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2013.791739

Whether readers always identify words in the order they are printed is subject to considerable debate. In the present study, we used the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975) to manipulate the preview for a two-word target region (e.g. white walls in My neighbor painted the white walls black). Readers received an identical (white walls), transposed (walls white), or unrelated preview (vodka clubs). We found that there was a clear cost of having a transposed preview compared to an identical preview, indicating that readers cannot or do not identify words out of order. However, on some measures, the transposed preview condition did lead to faster processing than the unrelated preview condition, suggesting that readers may be able to obtain some useful information from a transposed preview. Implications of the results for models of eye movement control in reading are discussed.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Rayner, K., Angele, B., Schotter, E.R. and Bicknell, K.

Journal: Visual Cognition

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 353-381

eISSN: 1464-0716

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2013.791739

Whether readers always identify words in the order they are printed is subject to considerable debate. In the present study, we used the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975) to manipulate the preview for a two-word target region (e.g., white walls in My neighbor painted the white walls black). Readers received an identical (white walls), transposed (walls white), or unrelated preview (vodka clubs). We found that there was a clear cost of having a transposed preview compared to an identical preview, indicating that readers cannot or do not identify words out of order. However, on some measures, the transposed preview condition did lead to faster processing than the unrelated preview condition, suggesting that readers may be able to obtain some useful information from a transposed preview. Implications of the results for models of eye movement control in reading are discussed. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

This source preferred by Bernhard Angele

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Rayner, K., Angele, B., Schotter, E.R. and Bicknell, K.

Journal: VISUAL COGNITION

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 353-381

ISSN: 1350-6285

DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2013.791739

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Rayner, K., Angele, B., Schotter, E.R. and Bicknell, K.

Journal: Visual cognition

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 353-381

ISSN: 1350-6285

Whether readers always identify words in the order they are printed is subject to considerable debate. In the present study, we used the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975) to manipulate the preview for a two-word target region (e.g. white walls in My neighbor painted the white walls black). Readers received an identical (white walls), transposed (walls white), or unrelated preview (vodka clubs). We found that there was a clear cost of having a transposed preview compared to an identical preview, indicating that readers cannot or do not identify words out of order. However, on some measures, the transposed preview condition did lead to faster processing than the unrelated preview condition, suggesting that readers may be able to obtain some useful information from a transposed preview. Implications of the results for models of eye movement control in reading are discussed.

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