Banking reform in China

Authors: Bai, B. and Hölscher, J.

http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84885775729&partnerID=40&md5=aa9580ab936e87ab42b7f08ae15e76c4

Journal: Accounting Reform in Transition and Developing Economies

DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-25708-2_3

This source preferred by Jens Holscher

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Bai, B. and Hölscher, J.

Pages: 45-65

DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-25708-2_3

China's banking reform has achieved significant progress in the past decade; however, problems and challenges remain. Our chapter argues that the inefficiency in the banking industry is mainly due to the system problem, and separate financial sector regulation restricts further banking development. Accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) will accelerate the speed of China's banking reform, even though with pain and at a price, and in turn, China will benefit from further integration into the world economy. The past decades witnessed successful economic reform in China, with GDP growth at an average rate of almost 8%; per capita GDP from US$266 at the end of 1979 to US$1,081 at the end of 2003 increased more than four times (Table 3.1). Successful accession to WTO on 11 December, 2001, accelerating the pace of economic reform and opening up speed to the world, meanwhile led China's integration even more into the global economy, and its share in world trade is now over 4 percent, compared with near zero in 1978 (Rodlauer and Heytnes, 2003, in 'Introduction and Overview'). Now, China has become the major driving force in the development of global economy and plays an important role. China's historical record on globalization is very poor. China has almost always been either a strong opponent to this historical process when it was strong enough, or a reluctant follower when it was too weak to voice its opposition. However, given the size of China's population and its dynamic economy over the last 20 years, the integration of China into the world economy will be of far-reaching significance (Wen, 2001). China could have a bigger impact on the global economy than the other economies in the future. © 2009 Springer US.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 24, 2020.