Fish Need Bicycles: An Exploration of the Perceptions of Male Social Work Students on a Qualifying Course

This source preferred by Sara Ashencaen Crabtree

Authors: Parker, J. and Ashencaen Crabtree, S.

http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/

Journal: British Journal of Social Work

Pages: 1-18

ISSN: 0045-3102

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcs117

The social work regulatory body in England, the General Social Care Council (GSCC), report the predominance of female professionals, where 77 per cent of registered social workers in 2009–10 were female. The disparity is even greater among social work students, with male enrolments declining from 16 per cent in 2006–07 to 13 per cent in 2007–08. The low proportion of male enrolments is of concern to the GSCC, who wish to encourage gender balance in the profession. This paper reports findings from a small-scale qualitative study exploring the perceptions of past and present male undergraduate students at a UK university, in respect of their gender status. Power relations between male students and predominantly female academic staff, practice teachers and practitioners are explored. This study is underpinned by a comprehensive but condensed review of research literature examining the male presence in social work and discourses pertaining to male students, practitioners and, of equal importance, service users.

This source preferred by Jonathan Parker

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Parker, J. and Crabtree, S.A.

Journal: British Journal of Social Work

Volume: 44

Issue: 2

Pages: 310-327

eISSN: 1468-263X

ISSN: 0045-3102

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcs117

The social work regulatory body in England, the General Social Care Council (GSCC), report the predominance of female professionals, where 77 per cent of registered social workers in 2009-10 were female. The disparity is even greater among social work students, with male enrolments declining from 16 per cent in 2006-07 to 13 per cent in 2007-08. The low proportion of male enrolments is of concern to the GSCC, who wish to encourage gender balance in the profession. This paper reports findings from a small-scale qualitative study exploring the perceptions of past and present male undergraduate students at a UK university, in respect of their gender status. Power relations between male students and predominantly female academic staff, practice teachers and practitioners are explored. This study is underpinned by a comprehensive but condensed review of research literature examining the male presence in social work and discourses pertaining to male students, practitioners and, of equal importance, service users. © The Author 2012.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Parker, J. and Crabtree, S.A.

Journal: BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK

Volume: 44

Issue: 2

Pages: 310-327

eISSN: 1468-263X

ISSN: 0045-3102

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcs117

The data on this page was last updated at 05:01 on March 20, 2019.