Chalk streams and grazing Mute Swans

Authors: Wood, K.A., Stillman, R.A., Daunt, F. and O'Hare, M.T.

Journal: British Wildlife

Volume: 25

Issue: 3

Pages: 171-176

ISSN: 0958-0956

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21082/

Source: Scopus

Chalk streams and grazing mute swans

Authors: Wood, K.A., Stillman, R.A., Daunt, F. and O'Hare, M.T.

Journal: British Wildlife

Volume: 25

Issue: 3

Pages: 171-176

Abstract:

The evidence shows that swan grazing can reduce plant abundance, prevent flowering, reduce water depth and reduce fishery value. However, these effects seem to be limited to a small number of sites on larger chalk streams. The results of attempted management have been disappointing, and we currently have no simple effective means of preventing grazing damage. However, our understanding of the effects of swans on the chalk stream ecosystem has been growing rapidly, which gives us hope for future solutions. In particular, combining strategies which improve river condition and move swans away from sensitive areas could offer a way of managing grazing effects.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21082/

http://britishwildlife.com/viewbackissue.asp?issueid=92

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Richard Stillman and Kevin Wood

Chalk streams and grazing mute swans

Authors: Wood, K.A., Stillman, R.A., Daunt, F. and O'Hare, M.T.

Journal: British Wildlife

Volume: 25

Issue: 3

Pages: 171-176

ISSN: 0958-0956

Abstract:

The evidence shows that swan grazing can reduce plant abundance, prevent flowering, reduce water depth and reduce fishery value. However, these effects seem to be limited to a small number of sites on larger chalk streams. The results of attempted management have been disappointing, and we currently have no simple effective means of preventing grazing damage. However, our understanding of the effects of swans on the chalk stream ecosystem has been growing rapidly, which gives us hope for future solutions. In particular, combining strategies which improve river condition and move swans away from sensitive areas could offer a way of managing grazing effects.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21082/

http://www.britishwildlife.com/

Source: BURO EPrints