Older people's participation in and engagement with falls prevention interventions in community settings: An augment to the cochrane systematic review

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: Age and Ageing

Volume: 41

Issue: 1

Pages: 16-23

eISSN: 1468-2834

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afr103

Abstract:

Background: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of fall prevention conducted in community settings have recently been systematically reviewed.Objective: to augment this review by analysing older people's participation in the trials and engagement with the interventions.Design: review of the 99 single and multifactorial RCTs included in the Cochrane systematic review of falls prevention interventions.Setting: community.Participants: adults aged 60+/mean age minus one standard deviation of 60+.Methods: calculated aggregate data on recruitment (proportion who accepted the invitation to participate), attrition at 12 month follow-up (loss of participants), adherence (to intervention protocol) and whether adherence moderated the effect of interventions on trial outcomes.Results: the median recruitment rate was 70.7% (64.2-81.7%, n = 78). At 12 months the median attrition rate including mortality was 10.9% (9.1-16.0%, n = 44). Adherence rates (n = 69) were ≥80% for vitamin D/calcium supplementation; ≥70% for walking and class-based exercise; 52% for individually targeted exercise; approximately 60-70% for fluid/nutrition therapy and interventions to increase knowledge; 58-59% for home modifications; but there was no improvement for medication review/withdrawal of certain drugs. Adherence to multifactorial interventions was generally ≥75% but ranged 28-95% for individual components. The 13 studies that tested for whether adherence moderated treatment effectiveness produced mixed results.Conclusions: using median rates for recruitment (70%), attrition (10%) and adherence (80%), we estimate that, at 12 months, on average half of community-dwelling older people are likely to be adhering to falls prevention interventions in clinical trials. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved.

Source: Scopus

Older people's participation in and engagement with falls prevention interventions in community settings: an augment to the Cochrane systematic review.

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: Age Ageing

Volume: 41

Issue: 1

Pages: 16-23

eISSN: 1468-2834

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afr103

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of fall prevention conducted in community settings have recently been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVE: To augment this review by analysing older people's participation in the trials and engagement with the interventions. DESIGN: Review of the 99 single and multifactorial RCTs included in the Cochrane systematic review of falls prevention interventions. SETTING: Community. PARTICIPANTS: Adults aged 60+/mean age minus one standard deviation of 60+. METHODS: Calculated aggregate data on recruitment (proportion who accepted the invitation to participate), attrition at 12 month follow-up (loss of participants), adherence (to intervention protocol) and whether adherence moderated the effect of interventions on trial outcomes. RESULTS: The median recruitment rate was 70.7% (64.2-81.7%, n = 78). At 12 months the median attrition rate including mortality was 10.9% (9.1-16.0%, n = 44). Adherence rates (n = 69) were ≥80% for vitamin D/calcium supplementation; ≥70% for walking and class-based exercise; 52% for individually targeted exercise; approximately 60-70% for fluid/nutrition therapy and interventions to increase knowledge; 58-59% for home modifications; but there was no improvement for medication review/withdrawal of certain drugs. Adherence to multifactorial interventions was generally ≥75% but ranged 28-95% for individual components. The 13 studies that tested for whether adherence moderated treatment effectiveness produced mixed results. CONCLUSIONS: Using median rates for recruitment (70%), attrition (10%) and adherence (80%), we estimate that, at 12 months, on average half of community-dwelling older people are likely to be adhering to falls prevention interventions in clinical trials.

Source: PubMed

Older people's participation in and engagement with falls prevention interventions in community settings: an augment to the cochrane systematic review

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: AGE AND AGEING

Volume: 41

Issue: 1

Pages: 16-23

eISSN: 1468-2834

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afr103

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Older people’s participation in and engagement with falls prevention interventions in community settings: An augment to the Cochrane systematic review

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: Age and Ageing

Volume: 41

Pages: 16-23

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afr103

Abstract:

Background: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of fall prevention conducted in community settings have recently been systematically reviewed.

Objective: to augment this review by analysing older people’s participation in the trials and engagement with the interventions.

Design: review of the 99 single and multifactorial RCTs included in the Cochrane systematic review of falls prevention interventions.

Setting: community.

Participants: adults aged 60+/mean age minus one standard deviation of 60+.

Methods: calculated aggregate data on recruitment (proportion who accepted the invitation to participate), attrition at 12 month follow-up (loss of participants), adherence (to intervention protocol) and whether adherence moderated the effect of interventions on trial outcomes.

Results: the median recruitment rate was 70.7% (64.2–81.7%, n = 78). At 12 months the median attrition rate including mortality was 10.9% (9.1–16.0%, n = 44). Adherence rates (n = 69) were ≥80% for vitamin D/calcium supplementation; ≥70 for walking and class-based exercise; 52% for individually targeted exercise; approximately 60–70% for fluid/nutrition therapy and interventions to increase knowledge; 58–59% for home modifications; but there was no improvement for medication review/withdrawal of certain drugs. Adherence to multifactorial interventions was generally ≥75% but ranged 28–95% for individual components. The 13 studies that tested for whether adherence moderated treatment effectiveness produced mixed results.

Conclusions: using median rates for recruitment (70%), attrition (10%) and adherence (80%), we estimate that, at 12 months, on average half of community-dwelling older people are likely to be adhering to falls prevention interventions in clinical trials.

http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2011/08/28/ageing.afr103.abstract?keytype=ref&ijkey=ZJd37Hzt1ouBTMf

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Samuel Nyman

Older people's participation in and engagement with falls prevention interventions in community settings: an augment to the Cochrane systematic review.

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: Age and ageing

Volume: 41

Issue: 1

Pages: 16-23

eISSN: 1468-2834

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afr103

Abstract:

Background

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of fall prevention conducted in community settings have recently been systematically reviewed.

Objective

To augment this review by analysing older people's participation in the trials and engagement with the interventions.

Design

Review of the 99 single and multifactorial RCTs included in the Cochrane systematic review of falls prevention interventions.

Setting

Community.

Participants

Adults aged 60+/mean age minus one standard deviation of 60+.

Methods

Calculated aggregate data on recruitment (proportion who accepted the invitation to participate), attrition at 12 month follow-up (loss of participants), adherence (to intervention protocol) and whether adherence moderated the effect of interventions on trial outcomes.

Results

The median recruitment rate was 70.7% (64.2-81.7%, n = 78). At 12 months the median attrition rate including mortality was 10.9% (9.1-16.0%, n = 44). Adherence rates (n = 69) were ≥80% for vitamin D/calcium supplementation; ≥70% for walking and class-based exercise; 52% for individually targeted exercise; approximately 60-70% for fluid/nutrition therapy and interventions to increase knowledge; 58-59% for home modifications; but there was no improvement for medication review/withdrawal of certain drugs. Adherence to multifactorial interventions was generally ≥75% but ranged 28-95% for individual components. The 13 studies that tested for whether adherence moderated treatment effectiveness produced mixed results.

Conclusions

Using median rates for recruitment (70%), attrition (10%) and adherence (80%), we estimate that, at 12 months, on average half of community-dwelling older people are likely to be adhering to falls prevention interventions in clinical trials.

Source: Europe PubMed Central