Ethical approval in developing countries is not optional

Authors: van Teijlingen, E.R. and Simkhada, P.P.

Journal: Journal of Medical Ethics

eISSN: 1473-4257

ISSN: 0306-6800

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/19407/

Source: Scopus

Ethical approval in developing countries is not optional

Authors: van Teijlingen, E.R. and Simkhada, P.P.

Journal: Journal of Medical Ethics

Volume: 38

Issue: 7

Pages: 428-430

eISSN: 1473-4257

ISSN: 0306-6800

DOI: 10.1136/medethics-2011-100123

Abstract:

When conducting health and medical research it is important to do the research ethically and to apply for prior ethical approval from the relevant authorities. The latter requirement is true for developed countries as well as developing countries. The authors argue that simply applying for research ethics approval from an institutional review board at a university based in a developed country is not enough to start a health research project in a developing country. The paper also suggests a number of reasons why researchers may fail to seek local research ethics permission in developing countries. The authors use a recent paper reporting research conducted in Nepal and published in an international journal as a case study to highlight the importance of being sensitive to local requirements regarding applying for and registering health and medical research.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/19407/

Source: Scopus

Preferred by: Edwin van Teijlingen

Ethical approval in developing countries is not optional.

Authors: van Teijlingen, E.R. and Simkhada, P.P.

Journal: J Med Ethics

Volume: 38

Issue: 7

Pages: 428-430

eISSN: 1473-4257

DOI: 10.1136/medethics-2011-100123

Abstract:

When conducting health and medical research it is important to do the research ethically and to apply for prior ethical approval from the relevant authorities. The latter requirement is true for developed countries as well as developing countries. The authors argue that simply applying for research ethics approval from an institutional review board at a university based in a developed country is not enough to start a health research project in a developing country. The paper also suggests a number of reasons why researchers may fail to seek local research ethics permission in developing countries. The authors use a recent paper reporting research conducted in Nepal and published in an international journal as a case study to highlight the importance of being sensitive to local requirements regarding applying for and registering health and medical research.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/19407/

Source: PubMed

Ethical approval in developing countries is not optional

Authors: van Teijlingen, E.R. and Simkhada, P.P.

Journal: JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS

Volume: 38

Issue: 7

Pages: 428-430

ISSN: 0306-6800

DOI: 10.1136/medethics-2011-100123

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/19407/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Ethical approval in developing countries is not optional

Authors: van Teijlingen, E. and Simkhada, P.

Journal: Journal of Medical Ethics

ISSN: 1473-4257

DOI: 10.1136/medethics-2011-100123

Abstract:

When conducting health and medical research it is not only important to do the research ethically, but also to apply for prior ethical approval from the relevant authorities. The latter requirement is true for developed countries as well as developing countries. We argue that simply applying for research ethics approval from an institutional review board at a university based in a developed country is not enough to start a health research project in a developing country. The paper also suggests a number of reasons why researchers may fail to seek local research ethics permission in developing countries. We use a recent paper reporting research conducted in Nepal and published in an international journal as a case study to highlight the importance of being sensitive to local requirements regarding applying for and registering health and medical research.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/19407/

http://jme.bmj.com/site/about/

Source: Manual

Ethical approval in developing countries is not optional.

Authors: van Teijlingen, E.R. and Simkhada, P.P.

Journal: Journal of medical ethics

Volume: 38

Issue: 7

Pages: 428-430

eISSN: 1473-4257

ISSN: 0306-6800

DOI: 10.1136/medethics-2011-100123

Abstract:

When conducting health and medical research it is important to do the research ethically and to apply for prior ethical approval from the relevant authorities. The latter requirement is true for developed countries as well as developing countries. The authors argue that simply applying for research ethics approval from an institutional review board at a university based in a developed country is not enough to start a health research project in a developing country. The paper also suggests a number of reasons why researchers may fail to seek local research ethics permission in developing countries. The authors use a recent paper reporting research conducted in Nepal and published in an international journal as a case study to highlight the importance of being sensitive to local requirements regarding applying for and registering health and medical research.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/19407/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Ethical approval in developing countries is not optional

Authors: van Teijlingen, E. and Simkhada, P.

Journal: Journal of Medical Ethics

ISSN: 1473-4257

Abstract:

When conducting health and medical research it is not only important to do the research ethically, but also to apply for prior ethical approval from the relevant authorities. The latter requirement is true for developed countries as well as developing countries. We argue that simply applying for research ethics approval from an institutional review board at a university based in a developed country is not enough to start a health research project in a developing country. The paper also suggests a number of reasons why researchers may fail to seek local research ethics permission in developing countries. We use a recent paper reporting research conducted in Nepal and published in an international journal as a case study to highlight the importance of being sensitive to local requirements regarding applying for and registering health and medical research.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/19407/

http://jme.bmj.com/site/about/

Source: BURO EPrints