Are Slovenian midwives and nurses ready to take on a greater role in caring for women with postnatal depression?

This source preferred by Vanora Hundley

Authors: Skočir, A.P. and Hundley, V.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2005.05.001

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 22

Pages: 40-55

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2005.05.001

OBJECTIVE: to answer the question of whether Slovenian midwives and nurses feel prepared to take over the responsibility for the care of women with postnatal depression.

DESIGN: questionnaire survey using a tool designed with data from previously conducted focus groups and a literature review.

SETTING: the central maternity hospital and six community centres in the Slovenian capital city of Ljubljana.

PARTICIPANTS: 134 participants completed the questionnaire, out of 175 distributed. The sample consisted of 86 participants from the maternity hospital, who were almost evenly divided into midwives and nurses, and 48 participants from the community services, where nurses prevailed over midwives.

FINDINGS: participants lacked knowledge of postnatal mental health, and 99% of them expressed the need for more information. They considered the woman's partner to be the most appropriate person to detect postnatal depression, and doctors to be the key people involved in the treatment. In order to take over the role of prevention, detection and management of postnatal depression, midwives and nurses felt that they would need more knowledge and more continuous contact with women.

KEY CONCLUSIONS: most participants did not know the main characteristics of postnatal depression, and were not confident in their knowledge. They felt that they lacked continuity in the care they could provide, and this affected their ability to establish a trusting relationship with women.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: information on postnatal mental health should be provided during undergraduate study of midwifery and nursing, and with continuous education through seminars and workshops in Slovenia. In order to enable continuity of carer, the role of the midwife should be expanded in pregnancy, and more visits in the puerperium should be planned.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Skocir, A.P. and Hundley, V.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 22

Issue: 1

Pages: 40-55

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2005.05.001

OBJECTIVE: to answer the question of whether Slovenian midwives and nurses feel prepared to take over the responsibility for the care of women with postnatal depression. DESIGN: questionnaire survey using a tool designed with data from previously conducted focus groups and a literature review. SETTING: the central maternity hospital and six community centres in the Slovenian capital city of Ljubljana. PARTICIPANTS: 134 participants completed the questionnaire, out of 175 distributed. The sample consisted of 86 participants from the maternity hospital, who were almost evenly divided into midwives and nurses, and 48 participants from the community services, where nurses prevailed over midwives. FINDINGS: participants lacked knowledge of postnatal mental health, and 99% of them expressed the need for more information. They considered the woman's partner to be the most appropriate person to detect postnatal depression, and doctors to be the key people involved in the treatment. In order to take over the role of prevention, detection and management of postnatal depression, midwives and nurses felt that they would need more knowledge and more continuous contact with women. KEY CONCLUSIONS: most participants did not know the main characteristics of postnatal depression, and were not confident in their knowledge. They felt that they lacked continuity in the care they could provide, and this affected their ability to establish a trusting relationship with women. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: information on postnatal mental health should be provided during undergraduate study of midwifery and nursing, and with continuous education through seminars and workshops in Slovenia. In order to enable continuity of carer, the role of the midwife should be expanded in pregnancy, and more visits in the puerperium should be planned.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Skočir, A.P. and Hundley, V.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 22

Issue: 1

Pages: 40-55

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2005.05.001

Objective: to answer the question of whether Slovenian midwives and nurses feel prepared to take over the responsibility for the care of women with postnatal depression. Design: questionnaire survey using a tool designed with data from previously conducted focus groups and a literature review. Setting: the central maternity hospital and six community centres in the Slovenian capital city of Ljubljana. Participants: 134 participants completed the questionnaire, out of 175 distributed. The sample consisted of 86 participants from the maternity hospital, who were almost evenly divided into midwives and nurses, and 48 participants from the community services, where nurses prevailed over midwives. Findings: participants lacked knowledge of postnatal mental health, and 99% of them expressed the need for more information. They considered the woman's partner to be the most appropriate person to detect postnatal depression, and doctors to be the key people involved in the treatment. In order to take over the role of prevention, detection and management of postnatal depression, midwives and nurses felt that they would need more knowledge and more continuous contact with women. Key conclusions: most participants did not know the main characteristics of postnatal depression, and were not confident in their knowledge. They felt that they lacked continuity in the care they could provide, and this affected their ability to establish a trusting relationship with women. Implications for practice: information on postnatal mental health should be provided during undergraduate study of midwifery and nursing, and with continuous education through seminars and workshops in Slovenia. In order to enable continuity of carer, the role of the midwife should be expanded in pregnancy, and more visits in the puerperium should be planned. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Skocir, A.P. and Hundley, V.

Journal: MIDWIFERY

Volume: 22

Issue: 1

Pages: 40-55

eISSN: 1532-3099

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2005.05.001

The data on this page was last updated at 05:10 on February 17, 2020.