What psychosocial well-being in the postnatal period means to midwives

This source preferred by Vanora Hundley

Authors: Gibb, S. and Hundley, V.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2006.07.005

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 23

Pages: 413-424

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2006.07.005

OBJECTIVE: to explore midwives' views of psychosocial well-being in the postnatal period.

DESIGN: qualitative study using focus-group interviews conducted in 1999.

SETTING: two community health centres and a school of nursing and midwifery in Scotland.

PARTICIPANTS: a convenience sample of community and student midwives.

ANALYSIS: thematic analysis was undertaken through the identification of codes, categories and themes.

FINDINGS: the categories were generated from the interview questions: 'the meaning midwives give to women's psychosocial well-being', 'midwives' assessment of women's well-being', and 'midwives views of worrying behaviours' displayed by women. From the first two categories, themes of 'coping', 'expectations', 'observation and communication skills', 'labour debriefing', and 'previous contact with women' emerged. Midwives assessed coping and unmet expectations through a range of communication and observational skills, including the use of a form of labour debriefing. Midwives who knew women during their pregnancy thought that they were able to assess coping and expectations better in the postnatal period. The midwives tended to describe women using stereotypical categories. From the third category, 'worrying behaviours', three themes emerged; 'extreme or obsessive behaviours about self, the baby or house' 'wanting to detain you' and 'quiet women'.

CONCLUSIONS: the meaning midwives give to psychosocial well-being includes a complex interplay between midwives' views of psychosocial well-being and their assessment of it. The importance midwives give to knowing women in pregnancy has implications for the ongoing debate about the provision of continuity of carer. Midwives used a range of techniques to elicit accurate information, to confirm problems or be reassured that all was well. Views based on stereotypical generalisations should be challenged.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Gibb, S. and Hundley, V.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 23

Issue: 4

Pages: 413-424

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2006.07.005

OBJECTIVE: to explore midwives' views of psychosocial well-being in the postnatal period. DESIGN: qualitative study using focus-group interviews conducted in 1999. SETTING: two community health centres and a school of nursing and midwifery in Scotland. PARTICIPANTS: a convenience sample of community and student midwives. ANALYSIS: thematic analysis was undertaken through the identification of codes, categories and themes. FINDINGS: the categories were generated from the interview questions: 'the meaning midwives give to women's psychosocial well-being', 'midwives' assessment of women's well-being', and 'midwives views of worrying behaviours' displayed by women. From the first two categories, themes of 'coping', 'expectations', 'observation and communication skills', 'labour debriefing', and 'previous contact with women' emerged. Midwives assessed coping and unmet expectations through a range of communication and observational skills, including the use of a form of labour debriefing. Midwives who knew women during their pregnancy thought that they were able to assess coping and expectations better in the postnatal period. The midwives tended to describe women using stereotypical categories. From the third category, 'worrying behaviours', three themes emerged; 'extreme or obsessive behaviours about self, the baby or house' 'wanting to detain you' and 'quiet women'. CONCLUSIONS: the meaning midwives give to psychosocial well-being includes a complex interplay between midwives' views of psychosocial well-being and their assessment of it. The importance midwives give to knowing women in pregnancy has implications for the ongoing debate about the provision of continuity of carer. Midwives used a range of techniques to elicit accurate information, to confirm problems or be reassured that all was well. Views based on stereotypical generalisations should be challenged.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Gibb, S. and Hundley, V.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 23

Issue: 4

Pages: 413-424

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2006.07.005

Objective: to explore midwives' views of psychosocial well-being in the postnatal period. Design: qualitative study using focus-group interviews conducted in 1999. Setting: two community health centres and a school of nursing and midwifery in Scotland. Participants: a convenience sample of community and student midwives. Analysis: thematic analysis was undertaken through the identification of codes, categories and themes. Findings: the categories were generated from the interview questions: 'the meaning midwives give to women's psychosocial well-being', 'midwives' assessment of women's well-being', and 'midwives views of worrying behaviours' displayed by women. From the first two categories, themes of 'coping', 'expectations', 'observation and communication skills', 'labour debriefing', and 'previous contact with women' emerged. Midwives assessed coping and unmet expectations through a range of communication and observational skills, including the use of a form of labour debriefing. Midwives who knew women during their pregnancy thought that they were able to assess coping and expectations better in the postnatal period. The midwives tended to describe women using stereotypical categories. From the third category, 'worrying behaviours', three themes emerged; 'extreme or obsessive behaviours about self, the baby or house' 'wanting to detain you' and 'quiet women'. Conlusions: the meaning midwives give to psychosocial well-being includes a complex interplay between midwives' views of psychosocial well-being and their assessment of it. The importance midwives give to knowing women in pregnancy has implications for the ongoing debate about the provision of continuity of carer. Midwives used a range of techniques to elicit accurate information, to confirm problems or be reassured that all was well. Views based on stereotypical generalisations should be challenged. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Gibb, S. and Hundley, V.

Journal: MIDWIFERY

Volume: 23

Issue: 4

Pages: 413-424

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2006.07.005

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 20, 2020.