Using economics alongside clinical trials: Why we cannot choose the evaluation technique in advance

This source preferred by Vanora Hundley

Authors: Donaldson, C., Hundley, V. and McIntosh, E.

Journal: Health economics

Volume: 5

Pages: 267-269

ISSN: 1057-9230

When drafting protocols for the use of economic evaluation alongside clinical trials, it is common to have to specify which type of economic evaluation is going to be carried out. Will it be a cost-benefit analysis (CBA), cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) or a cost-utility analysis (CUA)? It is our contention that prior specification of the appropriate economic technique is not possible, in the majority of cases, until data on effectiveness and cost are actually available. In this letter, we aim to demonstrate the thinking behind our contention and to illustrate this with two case studies; one of a recent randomised trial, the other of a trial currently in progress.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Donaldson, C., Hundley, V. and McIntosh, E.

Journal: Health Econ

Volume: 5

Issue: 3

Pages: 267-269

ISSN: 1057-9230

DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1050(199605)5:3<267::AID-HEC209>3.0.CO;2-X

When drafting protocols for the use of economic evaluation alongside clinical trials, it is common to have to specify which type of economic evaluation is going to be carried out. Will it be a cost-benefit analysis (CBA), cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) or a cost-utility analysis (CUA)? It is our contention that prior specification of the appropriate economic technique is not possible, in the majority of cases, until data on effectiveness and cost are actually available. In this letter, we aim to demonstrate the thinking behind our contention and to illustrate this with two case studies; one of a recent randomised trial, the other of a trial currently in progress.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Donaldson, C., Hundley, V. and McIntosh, E.

Journal: Health Economics

Volume: 5

Issue: 3

Pages: 267-269

ISSN: 1057-9230

DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1050(199605)5:3<267::AID-HEC209>3.0.CO;2-X

When drafting protocols for the use of economic evaluation alongside clinical trials, it is common to have to specify which type of economic evaluation is going to be carried out. Will it be a cost-benefit analysis (CBA), cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) or a cost-utility analysis (CUA)? It is our contention that prior specification of the appropriate economic technique is not possible, in the majority of cases, until data on effectiveness and cost are actually available. In this letter, we aim to demonstrate the thinking behind our contention and to illustrate this with two case studies; one of a recent randomised trial, the other of a trial currently in progress.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Donaldson, C., Hundley, V. and McIntosh, E.

Journal: HEALTH ECONOMICS

Volume: 5

Issue: 3

Pages: 267-269

ISSN: 1057-9230

DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1050(199605)5:3<267::AID-HEC209>3.0.CO;2-X

The data on this page was last updated at 05:10 on February 17, 2020.