A size-dependent migration strategy in Atlantic salmon smolts: Small smolts favour nocturnal migration

This source preferred by Adrian Pinder

Authors: Ibbotson, A.T., Beaumont, W.R.C. and Pinder, A.C.

Journal: Environmental Biology of Fishes

Volume: 92

Issue: 2

Pages: 151-157

DOI: 10.1007/s10641-011-9824-0

Migration theory states that migration behavioural strategies should be optimised to maximise fitness. Many studies have shown that in downstream migrating Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. smolts, mortality from predation is high and negatively size dependent. The most common predators are birds and piscivorous fish that are mainly daylight feeders. Given the high mortality during this stage we should expect to observe smolts to follow predator avoidance strategies that may be affected by body size. We tested the hypothesis that small smolts have a higher tendency to exhibit predator avoidance strategies (i.e. nocturnal versus diurnal migration) than larger smolts. The number and size of out-migrating/downstream-migrating wild Atlantic salmon smolts was recorded as they passed through a glass-sided channel during April-May, 1996–1999. In all years, the mean size of nocturnal migrating smolts was significantly lower than the mean size of diurnal migrating smolts. Analysis of the size of smolts, during early and late stages of the migration period showed size-dependent nocturnal migration behaviour up to the end of April. After this, no such size dependent migration pattern was observed. However, small smolts (<100mm) were absent during this period. We suggest that nocturnal migration is an adaptive behaviour that small Atlantic salmon smolts have to avoid predation by large daylight feeding visual piscivorous predators (e.g. pike Esox Lucius L. and fish eating birds).

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Ibbotson, A.T., Beaumont, W.R.C. and Pinder, A.C.

Journal: Environmental Biology of Fishes

Volume: 92

Issue: 2

Pages: 151-157

ISSN: 0378-1909

DOI: 10.1007/s10641-011-9824-0

Migration theory states that migration behavioural strategies should be optimised to maximise fitness. Many studies have shown that in downstream migrating Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. smolts, mortality from predation is high and negatively size dependent. The most common predators are birds and piscivorous fish that are mainly daylight feeders. Given the high mortality during this stage we should expect to observe smolts to follow predator avoidance strategies that may be affected by body size. We tested the hypothesis that small smolts have a higher tendency to exhibit predator avoidance strategies (i. e. nocturnal versus diurnal migration) than larger smolts. The number and size of out-migrating/downstream-migrating wild Atlantic salmon smolts was recorded as they passed through a glass-sided channel during April-May, 1996-1999. In all years, the mean size of nocturnal migrating smolts was significantly lower than the mean size of diurnal migrating smolts. Analysis of the size of smolts, during early and late stages of the migration period showed size-dependent nocturnal migration behaviour up to the end of April. After this, no such size dependent migration pattern was observed. However, small smolts (<100 mm) were absent during this period. We suggest that nocturnal migration is an adaptive behaviour that small Atlantic salmon smolts have to avoid predation by large daylight feeding visual piscivorous predators (e. g. pike Esox Lucius L. and fish eating birds). © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Ibbotson, A.T., Beaumont, W.R.C. and Pinder, A.C.

Journal: ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OF FISHES

Volume: 92

Issue: 2

Pages: 151-157

ISSN: 0378-1909

DOI: 10.1007/s10641-011-9824-0

The data on this page was last updated at 11:59 on June 25, 2019.