A Spatial Frequency Account of the Detriment That Local Processing of Navon Letters Has on Face Recognition

This source preferred by Peter Arabaci Hills

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Volume: 35

Pages: 1427

Publisher: American Psychological Association

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform

Volume: 35

Issue: 5

Pages: 1427-1442

eISSN: 1939-1277

DOI: 10.1037/a0015788

Five minutes of processing the local features of a Navon letter causes a detriment in subsequent face-recognition performance (Macrae & Lewis, 2002). We hypothesize a perceptual after effect explanation of this effect in which face recognition is less accurate after adapting to high-spatial frequencies at high contrasts. Five experiments were conducted in which face-recognition performance was compared after processing high-contrast Navon stimuli. The standard recognition deficit was observed for processing the local features of Navon stimuli, but not if the stimuli were blurred (Experiment 1) or if they were of lower contrast (Experiment 2). A face-recognition deficit was observed after processing small, high-contrast letters equivalent to local processing of Navon letters (Experiment 3). Experiments 4 and 5 demonstrated that recognition of bandpass-filtered faces interacted with the type of Navon processing, in which the recognition of low-pass filtered faces was better following local rather than global processing. These results suggest that the Navon effect on subsequent face recognition is a perceptual phenomenon.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Volume: 35

Issue: 5

Pages: 1427-1442

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/a0015788

Five minutes of processing the local features of a Navon letter causes a detriment in subsequent face-recognition performance (Macrae & Lewis, 2002). We hypothesize a perceptual after effect explanation of this effect in which face recognition is less accurate after adapting to high-spatial frequencies at high contrasts. Five experiments were conducted in which face-recognition performance was compared after processing high-contrast Navon stimuli. The standard recognition deficit was observed for processing the local features of Navon stimuli, but not if the stimuli were blurred (Experiment 1) or if they were of lower contrast (Experiment 2). A face-recognition deficit was observed after processing small, high-contrast letters equivalent to local processing of Navon letters (Experiment 3). Experiments 4 and 5 demonstrated that recognition of bandpass-filtered faces interacted with the type of Navon processing, in which the recognition of low-pass filtered faces was better following local rather than global processing. These results suggest that the Navon effect on subsequent face recognition is a perceptual phenomenon. © 2009 American Psychological Association.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance

Volume: 35

Issue: 5

Pages: 1427-1442

eISSN: 1939-1277

ISSN: 0096-1523

Five minutes of processing the local features of a Navon letter causes a detriment in subsequent face-recognition performance (Macrae & Lewis, 2002). We hypothesize a perceptual after effect explanation of this effect in which face recognition is less accurate after adapting to high-spatial frequencies at high contrasts. Five experiments were conducted in which face-recognition performance was compared after processing high-contrast Navon stimuli. The standard recognition deficit was observed for processing the local features of Navon stimuli, but not if the stimuli were blurred (Experiment 1) or if they were of lower contrast (Experiment 2). A face-recognition deficit was observed after processing small, high-contrast letters equivalent to local processing of Navon letters (Experiment 3). Experiments 4 and 5 demonstrated that recognition of bandpass-filtered faces interacted with the type of Navon processing, in which the recognition of low-pass filtered faces was better following local rather than global processing. These results suggest that the Navon effect on subsequent face recognition is a perceptual phenomenon.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.