Stereotype priming in face recognition: Interactions between semantic and visual information in face encoding

This source preferred by Peter Arabaci Hills

Authors: Hills, P.J., Lewis, M.B. and Honey, R.C.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 108

Pages: 185-200

Publisher: Elsevier

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Lewis, M.B. and Honey, R.C.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 108

Issue: 1

Pages: 185-200

ISSN: 0010-0277

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2008.03.004

The accuracy with which previously unfamiliar faces are recognised is increased by the presentation of a stereotype-congruent occupation label [Klatzky, R. L., Martin, G. L., & Kane, R. A. (1982a). Semantic interpretation effects on memory for faces. Memory & Cognition, 10, 195-206; Klatzky, R. L., Martin, G. L., & Kane, R. A. (1982b). Influence of social-category activation on processing of visual information. Social Cognition, 1, 95-109]. For example, providing the label 'criminal' both during encoding and test improves recognition for previously unfamiliar faces that look like the stereotypical criminal. Experiments 1 and 2 both replicate this effect and show that the label exerts its influence during the encoding of stereotypical faces and has little influence at test. These findings indicate that semantic information that is congruent with novel stereotypical faces facilitates their encoding.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Lewis, M.B. and Honey, R.C.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 108

Issue: 1

Pages: 185-200

ISSN: 0010-0277

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2008.03.004

The accuracy with which previously unfamiliar faces are recognised is increased by the presentation of a stereotype-congruent occupation label [Klatzky, R. L., Martin, G. L., & Kane, R. A. (1982a). Semantic interpretation effects on memory for faces. Memory & Cognition, 10, 195-206; Klatzky, R. L., Martin, G. L., & Kane, R. A. (1982b). Influence of social-category activation on processing of visual information. Social Cognition, 1, 95-109]. For example, providing the label 'criminal' both during encoding and test improves recognition for previously unfamiliar faces that look like the stereotypical criminal. Experiments 1 and 2 both replicate this effect and show that the label exerts its influence during the encoding of stereotypical faces and has little influence at test. These findings indicate that semantic information that is congruent with novel stereotypical faces facilitates their encoding. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Lewis, M.B. and Honey, R.C.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 108

Issue: 1

Pages: 185-200

eISSN: 1873-7838

ISSN: 0010-0277

The accuracy with which previously unfamiliar faces are recognised is increased by the presentation of a stereotype-congruent occupation label [Klatzky, R. L., Martin, G. L., & Kane, R. A. (1982a). Semantic interpretation effects on memory for faces. Memory & Cognition, 10, 195-206; Klatzky, R. L., Martin, G. L., & Kane, R. A. (1982b). Influence of social-category activation on processing of visual information. Social Cognition, 1, 95-109]. For example, providing the label 'criminal' both during encoding and test improves recognition for previously unfamiliar faces that look like the stereotypical criminal. Experiments 1 and 2 both replicate this effect and show that the label exerts its influence during the encoding of stereotypical faces and has little influence at test. These findings indicate that semantic information that is congruent with novel stereotypical faces facilitates their encoding.

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