The own-age face recognition bias in children and adults

This source preferred by Peter Arabaci Hills

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume: 64

Pages: 17-23

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)

Volume: 64

Issue: 1

Pages: 17-23

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2010.537926

Children recognize children's faces more accurately than adult faces, and adults recognize adult faces more accurately than children's faces (e.g., Anastasi & Rhodes, 2005). This is the own-age bias. Research has shown that this bias is at least partially based on experience since trainee teachers show less of an own-age bias than do other adults (Harrison & Hole, 2009). The present research tested the own-age bias in three groups of children (age 4-6, 7-9, 10-12 years) and a group of adults in the recognition of three age groups of faces (age 7-9, 20-22, and 65-90 years). Results showed an own-age bias for 7- to 9-year-old children and adults. Specifically, children could recognize faces more accurately if they were less than two years different from their own age than if they were more than two years older or younger. These results are discussed in terms of short-term experience with faces creating biases, and this rapidly changes with age.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume: 64

Issue: 1

Pages: 17-23

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2010.537926

Children recognize children's faces more accurately than adult faces, and adults recognize adult faces more accurately than children's faces (e.g., Anastasi & Rhodes, 2005). This is the own-age bias. Research has shown that this bias is at least partially based on experience since trainee teachers show less of an own-age bias than do other adults (Harrison & Hole, 2009). The present research tested the own-age bias in three groups of children (age 4-6, 7-9, 10-12 years) and a group of adults in the recognition of three age groups of faces (age 7-9, 20-22, and 65-90 years). Results showed an own-age bias for 7- to 9-year-old children and adults. Specifically, children could recognize faces more accurately if they were less than two years different from their own age than if they were more than two years older or younger. These results are discussed in terms of short-term experience with faces creating biases, and this rapidly changes with age. © 2010 The Experimental Psychology Society.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)

Volume: 64

Issue: 1

Pages: 17-23

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

Children recognize children's faces more accurately than adult faces, and adults recognize adult faces more accurately than children's faces (e.g., Anastasi & Rhodes, 2005). This is the own-age bias. Research has shown that this bias is at least partially based on experience since trainee teachers show less of an own-age bias than do other adults (Harrison & Hole, 2009). The present research tested the own-age bias in three groups of children (age 4-6, 7-9, 10-12 years) and a group of adults in the recognition of three age groups of faces (age 7-9, 20-22, and 65-90 years). Results showed an own-age bias for 7- to 9-year-old children and adults. Specifically, children could recognize faces more accurately if they were less than two years different from their own age than if they were more than two years older or younger. These results are discussed in terms of short-term experience with faces creating biases, and this rapidly changes with age.

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