Sad people avoid the eyes or happy people focus on the eyes? Mood induction affects facial feature discrimination

This source preferred by Peter Arabaci Hills

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: British Journal of Psychology

Volume: 102

Pages: 260-274

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Br J Psychol

Volume: 102

Issue: 2

Pages: 260-274

eISSN: 2044-8295

DOI: 10.1348/000712610X519314

Depressed people tend to avoid eye-contact in social situations and in experimental settings, whereas happy people actively seek eye-contact. We report an experiment in which participants made discriminations between faces that had either configural or featural changes made to the eyes, nose, or head shape. The results showed participants induced to be happy detected changes in eyes more often than participants induced to be sad, but failed to detect changes in other facial features. Sad-induced participants detected changes to the head shape but not the eyes. The results are interpreted in terms of differential use of features attended to by happy and sad participants, whereby happy people are more likely to attend to eyes during face perception than sad people.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: British Journal of Psychology

Volume: 102

Issue: 2

Pages: 260-274

eISSN: 2044-8325

DOI: 10.1348/000712610X519314

Depressed people tend to avoid eye-contact in social situations and in experimental settings, whereas happy people actively seek eye-contact. We report an experiment in which participants made discriminations between faces that had either configural or featural changes made to the eyes, nose, or head shape. The results showed participants induced to be happy detected changes in eyes more often than participants induced to be sad, but failed to detect changes in other facial features. Sad-induced participants detected changes to the head shape but not the eyes. The results are interpreted in terms of differential use of features attended to by happy and sad participants, whereby happy people are more likely to attend to eyes during face perception than sad people. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: British journal of psychology (London, England : 1953)

Volume: 102

Issue: 2

Pages: 260-274

ISSN: 0007-1269

Depressed people tend to avoid eye-contact in social situations and in experimental settings, whereas happy people actively seek eye-contact. We report an experiment in which participants made discriminations between faces that had either configural or featural changes made to the eyes, nose, or head shape. The results showed participants induced to be happy detected changes in eyes more often than participants induced to be sad, but failed to detect changes in other facial features. Sad-induced participants detected changes to the head shape but not the eyes. The results are interpreted in terms of differential use of features attended to by happy and sad participants, whereby happy people are more likely to attend to eyes during face perception than sad people.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.