Attention Misplaced: The Role of Diagnostic Features in the Face-Inversion Effect

This source preferred by Peter Arabaci Hills

Authors: Hills, P.J., Ross, D.A. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Volume: 37

Pages: 1396

Publisher: American Psychological Association

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Ross, D.A. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform

Volume: 37

Issue: 5

Pages: 1396-1406

eISSN: 1939-1277

DOI: 10.1037/a0024247

Inversion disproportionately impairs recognition of face stimuli compared to nonface stimuli arguably due to the holistic manner in which faces are processed. A qualification is put forward in which the first point fixated on is different for upright and inverted faces and this carries some of the face-inversion effect. Three experiments explored this possibility by using fixation crosses to guide attention to the eye or mouth region of the to-be-presented faces in different orientations. Recognition was better when the fixation cross appeared at the eye region than at the mouth region. The face-inversion effect was smaller when the eyes were cued than when the mouth was cued or when there was no cueing. The results suggest that the first facial feature attended to is important for accurate face recognition and this may carry some of the effects of inversion.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Ross, D.A. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Volume: 37

Issue: 5

Pages: 1396-1406

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/a0024247

Inversion disproportionately impairs recognition of face stimuli compared to nonface stimuli arguably due to the holistic manner in which faces are processed. A qualification is put forward in which the first point fixated on is different for upright and inverted faces and this carries some of the face-inversion effect. Three experiments explored this possibility by using fixation crosses to guide attention to the eye or mouth region of the to-be-presented faces in different orientations. Recognition was better when the fixation cross appeared at the eye region than at the mouth region. The face-inversion effect was smaller when the eyes were cued than when the mouth was cued or when there was no cueing. The results suggest that the first facial feature attended to is important for accurate face recognition and this may carry some of the effects of inversion. © 2011 American Psychological Association.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Ross, D.A. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance

Volume: 37

Issue: 5

Pages: 1396-1406

eISSN: 1939-1277

ISSN: 0096-1523

Inversion disproportionately impairs recognition of face stimuli compared to nonface stimuli arguably due to the holistic manner in which faces are processed. A qualification is put forward in which the first point fixated on is different for upright and inverted faces and this carries some of the face-inversion effect. Three experiments explored this possibility by using fixation crosses to guide attention to the eye or mouth region of the to-be-presented faces in different orientations. Recognition was better when the fixation cross appeared at the eye region than at the mouth region. The face-inversion effect was smaller when the eyes were cued than when the mouth was cued or when there was no cueing. The results suggest that the first facial feature attended to is important for accurate face recognition and this may carry some of the effects of inversion.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.