A specialist adolescent self-harm service.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: McAlaney, J., Fyfe, M. and Dale, M.

Journal: Nurs Stand

Volume: 18

Issue: 17

Pages: 33-38

ISSN: 0029-6570

AIM: To investigate the scale of adolescent deliberate self-harm (DSH) presentations to accident and emergency (A&E) departments and minor injury units in Glasgow and to assess the success of the adolescent DSH service in accessing this group. METHOD: A retrospective case note analysis was carried out in collaboration with the Greater Glasgow Health Board, using a standardised proforma. The data collection focused on adolescents aged 12-17 years presenting with DSH during a ten-week period in 2002. The records of each presentation to A&E departments and minor injury units were examined, and follow-up medical records were obtained for those who had been admitted to a ward. RESULTS: There were 86 recorded presentations of adolescent DSH during the study period. No significant relationships between age, sex, form of self-harm or any other variable recorded were found. Over half of those presenting were admitted to a ward, the majority of whom were subsequently referred to the DSH service. Those treated solely in A&E tended not to be referred. CONCLUSION: The findings of the study show that there are a significant number of young people who self-harm, but that they receive no follow-up care.

This source preferred by John McAlaney

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: McAlaney, J., Fyfe, M. and Dale, M.

Journal: Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)

Volume: 18

Issue: 17

Pages: 33-38

ISSN: 0029-6570

AIM: To investigate the scale of adolescent deliberate self-harm (DSH) presentations to accident and emergency (A&E) departments and minor injury units in Glasgow and to assess the success of the adolescent DSH service in accessing this group. METHOD: A retrospective case note analysis was carried out in collaboration with the Greater Glasgow Health Board, using a standardised proforma. The data collection focused on adolescents aged 12-17 years presenting with DSH during a ten-week period in 2002. The records of each presentation to A&E departments and minor injury units were examined, and follow-up medical records were obtained for those who had been admitted to a ward. RESULTS: There were 86 recorded presentations of adolescent DSH during the study period. No significant relationships between age, sex, form of self-harm or any other variable recorded were found. Over half of those presenting were admitted to a ward, the majority of whom were subsequently referred to the DSH service. Those treated solely in A&E tended not to be referred. CONCLUSION: The findings of the study show that there are a significant number of young people who self-harm, but that they receive no follow-up care.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: McAlaney, J., Fyfe, M. and Dale, M.

Journal: Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)

Volume: 18

Issue: 17

Pages: 33-38

eISSN: 2047-9018

ISSN: 0029-6570

AIM: To investigate the scale of adolescent deliberate self-harm (DSH) presentations to accident and emergency (A&E) departments and minor injury units in Glasgow and to assess the success of the adolescent DSH service in accessing this group. METHOD: A retrospective case note analysis was carried out in collaboration with the Greater Glasgow Health Board, using a standardised proforma. The data collection focused on adolescents aged 12-17 years presenting with DSH during a ten-week period in 2002. The records of each presentation to A&E departments and minor injury units were examined, and follow-up medical records were obtained for those who had been admitted to a ward. RESULTS: There were 86 recorded presentations of adolescent DSH during the study period. No significant relationships between age, sex, form of self-harm or any other variable recorded were found. Over half of those presenting were admitted to a ward, the majority of whom were subsequently referred to the DSH service. Those treated solely in A&E tended not to be referred. CONCLUSION: The findings of the study show that there are a significant number of young people who self-harm, but that they receive no follow-up care.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:56 on September 25, 2018.