Face-space: A unifying concept in face recognition research

This source preferred by Peter Arabaci Hills

Authors: Valentine, T., Lewis, M.B. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22665/

Journal: QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 69

Issue: 10

Pages: 1996-2019

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2014.990392

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Valentine, T., Lewis, M.B. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22665/

Journal: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)

Volume: 69

Issue: 10

Pages: 1996-2019

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2014.990392

The concept of a multidimensional psychological space, in which faces can be represented according to their perceived properties, is fundamental to the modern theorist in face processing. Yet the idea was not clearly expressed until 1991. The background that led to the development of face-space is explained, and its continuing influence on theories of face processing is discussed. Research that has explored the properties of the face-space and sought to understand caricature, including facial adaptation paradigms, is reviewed. Face-space as a theoretical framework for understanding the effect of ethnicity and the development of face recognition is evaluated. Finally, two applications of face-space in the forensic setting are discussed. From initially being presented as a model to explain distinctiveness, inversion, and the effect of ethnicity, face-space has become a central pillar in many aspects of face processing. It is currently being developed to help us understand adaptation effects with faces. While being in principle a simple concept, face-space has shaped, and continues to shape, our understanding of face perception.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Valentine, T., Lewis, M.B. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22665/

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume: 69

Issue: 10

Pages: 1996-2019

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2014.990392

© 2015 The Experimental Psychology Society. The concept of a multidimensional psychological space, in which faces can be represented according to their perceived properties, is fundamental to the modern theorist in face processing. Yet the idea was not clearly expressed until 1991. The background that led to the development of face-space is explained, and its continuing influence on theories of face processing is discussed. Research that has explored the properties of the face-space and sought to understand caricature, including facial adaptation paradigms, is reviewed. Face-space as a theoretical framework for understanding the effect of ethnicity and the development of face recognition is evaluated. Finally, two applications of face-space in the forensic setting are discussed. From initially being presented as a model to explain distinctiveness, inversion, and the effect of ethnicity, face-space has become a central pillar in many aspects of face processing. It is currently being developed to help us understand adaptation effects with faces. While being in principle a simple concept, face-space has shaped, and continues to shape, our understanding of face perception.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Valentine, T., Lewis, M.B. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22665/

Journal: QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 69

Issue: 10

Pages: 1996-2019

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2014.990392

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Valentine, T., Lewis, M.B. and Hills, P.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22665/

Journal: Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)

Volume: 69

Issue: 10

Pages: 1996-2019

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

The concept of a multidimensional psychological space, in which faces can be represented according to their perceived properties, is fundamental to the modern theorist in face processing. Yet the idea was not clearly expressed until 1991. The background that led to the development of face-space is explained, and its continuing influence on theories of face processing is discussed. Research that has explored the properties of the face-space and sought to understand caricature, including facial adaptation paradigms, is reviewed. Face-space as a theoretical framework for understanding the effect of ethnicity and the development of face recognition is evaluated. Finally, two applications of face-space in the forensic setting are discussed. From initially being presented as a model to explain distinctiveness, inversion, and the effect of ethnicity, face-space has become a central pillar in many aspects of face processing. It is currently being developed to help us understand adaptation effects with faces. While being in principle a simple concept, face-space has shaped, and continues to shape, our understanding of face perception.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.