Exploring the tourist destination as a mosaic: The alternative lifecycles of the seaside amusement arcade sector in Britain

Authors: Chapman, A. and Light, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22259/

Journal: Tourism Management

Volume: 52

Issue: Feb 2016

Pages: 254-263

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 1879-3193

DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2015.06.020

One criticism of the tourism area lifecycle model is that it treats destinations as homogeneous entities. Instead destinations can be conceptualised as a mosaic of elements, each of which can follow a lifecycle that is different from that of the destination overall. This paper examines this issue with reference to amusement arcades in British seaside resorts and triangulates secondary sources and in-depth interviews to examine the historical evolution of this sector. It argues that the arcade sector has followed a lifecycle trajectory that is independent of the resorts in which they are located. A range of internal/external factors and global, national and local influences have affected the lifecycle of the arcade sector, including global developments in the entertainment industries; the influence of state policies and legislation; and the responses of local entrepreneurs to resort restructuring. The paper ends by arguing that destinations can be conceptualised as 'assemblages' of interacting elements.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Chapman, A. and Light, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22259/

Journal: Tourism Management

Volume: 52

Pages: 254-263

ISSN: 0261-5177

DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2015.06.020

© 2015 The Authors. One criticism of the tourism area lifecycle model is that it treats destinations as homogeneous entities. Instead destinations can be conceptualised as a mosaic of elements, each of which can follow a lifecycle that is different from that of the destination overall. This paper examines this issue with reference to amusement arcades in British seaside resorts and triangulates secondary sources and in-depth interviews to examine the historical evolution of this sector. It argues that the arcade sector has followed a lifecycle trajectory that is independent of the resorts in which they are located. A range of internal/external factors and global, national and local influences have affected the lifecycle of the arcade sector, including global developments in the entertainment industries; the influence of state policies and legislation; and the responses of local entrepreneurs to resort restructuring. The paper ends by arguing that destinations can be conceptualised as 'assemblages' of interacting elements.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Chapman, A. and Light, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22259/

Journal: TOURISM MANAGEMENT

Volume: 52

Pages: 254-263

eISSN: 1879-3193

ISSN: 0261-5177

DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2015.06.020

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