Exploring the tourist destination as a mosaic: The alternative lifecycles of the seaside amusement arcade sector in Britain

Authors: Chapman, A. and Light, D.

Journal: Tourism Management

Volume: 52

Pages: 254-263

ISSN: 0261-5177

DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2015.06.020

Abstract:

One criticism of the tourism area lifecycle model is that it treats destinations as homogeneous entities. Instead destinations can be conceptualised as a mosaic of elements, each of which can follow a lifecycle that is different from that of the destination overall. This paper examines this issue with reference to amusement arcades in British seaside resorts and triangulates secondary sources and in-depth interviews to examine the historical evolution of this sector. It argues that the arcade sector has followed a lifecycle trajectory that is independent of the resorts in which they are located. A range of internal/external factors and global, national and local influences have affected the lifecycle of the arcade sector, including global developments in the entertainment industries; the influence of state policies and legislation; and the responses of local entrepreneurs to resort restructuring. The paper ends by arguing that destinations can be conceptualised as 'assemblages' of interacting elements.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22259/

Source: Scopus

Exploring the tourist destination as a mosaic: The alternative lifecycles of the seaside amusement arcade sector in Britain

Authors: Chapman, A. and Light, D.

Journal: TOURISM MANAGEMENT

Volume: 52

Pages: 254-263

eISSN: 1879-3193

ISSN: 0261-5177

DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2015.06.020

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22259/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Exploring the tourist destination as a mosaic: The alternative lifecycles of the seaside amusement arcade sector in Britain

Authors: Chapman, A. and Light, D.

Journal: Tourism Management

Volume: 52

Issue: Feb 2016

Pages: 254-263

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 1879-3193

DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2015.06.020

Abstract:

One criticism of the tourism area lifecycle model is that it treats destinations as homogeneous entities. Instead destinations can be conceptualised as a mosaic of elements, each of which can follow a lifecycle that is different from that of the destination overall. This paper examines this issue with reference to amusement arcades in British seaside resorts and triangulates secondary sources and in-depth interviews to examine the historical evolution of this sector. It argues that the arcade sector has followed a lifecycle trajectory that is independent of the resorts in which they are located. A range of internal/external factors and global, national and local influences have affected the lifecycle of the arcade sector, including global developments in the entertainment industries; the influence of state policies and legislation; and the responses of local entrepreneurs to resort restructuring. The paper ends by arguing that destinations can be conceptualised as 'assemblages' of interacting elements.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22259/

Source: Manual