Towards a Global Tree Assessment

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Newton, A., Oldfield, S., Rivers, M., Mark, J., Schatz, G., Garavito, N.T., Cantarello, E., Golicher, D., Cayuela, L. and Miles, L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22246/

Journal: ORYX

Volume: 49

Issue: 3

Pages: 410-415

eISSN: 1365-3008

ISSN: 0030-6053

DOI: 10.1017/S0030605315000137

Copyright © 2015 Fauna & Flora International. Although trees have high economic, cultural and ecological value, increasing numbers of species are potentially at risk of extinction because of forest loss and degradation as a result of human activities, including overharvesting, fire and grazing. Emerging threats include climate change and its interaction with the spread of pests and diseases. The impact of such threats on the conservation status of trees is poorly understood. Here we highlight the need to conduct a comprehensive conservation assessment of the world's tree species, building on previous assessments undertaken for the IUCN Red List. We suggest that recent developments in plant systematics, online databases, remote sensing data and associated analytical tools offer an unprecedented opportunity to conduct such an assessment. We provide an overview of how a Global Tree Assessment could be achieved in practice, through participative, open-access approaches to data sharing and evaluation.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Newton, A., Oldfield, S., Rivers, M., Mark, J., Schatz, G., Garavito, N.T., Cantarello, E., Golicher, D., Cayuela, L. and Miles, L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22246/

Journal: ORYX

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

eISSN: 1365-3008

ISSN: 0030-6053

DOI: 10.1017/S0030605315000137

Although trees have high economic, cultural and ecological value, increasing numbers of species are potentially at risk of extinction because of forest loss and degradation as a result of human activities, including overharvesting, fire and grazing. Emerging threats include climate change and its interaction with the spread of pests and diseases. The impact of such threats on the conservation status of trees is poorly understood. Here we highlight the need to conduct a comprehensive conservation assessment of the world's tree species, building on previous assessments undertaken for the IUCN Red List. We suggest that recent developments in plant systematics, online databases, remote sensing data and associated analytical tools offer an unprecedented opportunity to conduct such an assessment. We provide an overview of how a Global Tree Assessment could be achieved in practice, through participative, open-access approaches to data sharing and evaluation.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Newton, A., Oldfield, S., Rivers, M., Mark, J., Schatz, G., Garavito, N.T., Cantarello, E., Golicher, D., Cayuela, L. and Miles, L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22246/

Journal: ORYX

Volume: 49

Issue: 3

Pages: 410-415

eISSN: 1365-3008

ISSN: 0030-6053

DOI: 10.1017/S0030605315000137

The data on this page was last updated at 04:53 on April 26, 2019.