The relationship between core symptoms of ADHD and the Cognitive Reflection Test in a non-clinical sample

Authors: Elisa, R.N. and Parris, B.A.

Journal: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

Publisher: Routledge

eISSN: 1464-0619

ISSN: 1354-6805

DOI: 10.1080/13546805.2015.1068687

Abstract:

Introduction. Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms are frequently linked to executive function deficits. There is reason to believe that these deficits may give rise to problems with complex reasoning and problem solving. Methods. Eighty-six men (Nā€‰=ā€‰45) and women (Nā€‰=ā€‰41) completed a self-report measure to assess ADHD symptoms, along with a complex reasoning task; the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT). IQ was also tested due to its covariance with reasoning ability. Results. Analysis suggested that all three symptoms of ADHD (inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity) are negatively related to performance on the CRT, however, only inattention significantly contributed to a model that predicted CRT performance. Conclusions. Of the three core symptoms of ADHD, inattention is the most important for reasoning ability. Results are discussed with reference to an executive function model of ADHD, with particular emphasis on the role of working memory in inattention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23336/

Source: Scopus

The relationship between core symptoms of ADHD and the Cognitive Reflection Test in a non-clinical sample

Authors: Elisa, R.N. and Parris, B.A.

Journal: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 416-423

eISSN: 1464-0619

ISSN: 1354-6805

DOI: 10.1080/13546805.2015.1068687

Abstract:

Introduction. Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms are frequently linked to executive function deficits. There is reason to believe that these deficits may give rise to problems with complex reasoning and problem solving.Methods. Eighty-six men (N = 45) and women (N = 41) completed a self-report measure to assess ADHD symptoms, along with a complex reasoning task; the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT). IQ was also tested due to its covariance with reasoning ability.Results. Analysis suggested that all three symptoms of ADHD (inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity) are negatively related to performance on the CRT, however, only inattention significantly contributed to a model that predicted CRT performance.Conclusions. Of the three core symptoms of ADHD, inattention is the most important for reasoning ability. Results are discussed with reference to an executive function model of ADHD, with particular emphasis on the role of working memory in inattention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23336/

Source: Scopus

The relationship between core symptoms of ADHD and the Cognitive Reflection Test in a non-clinical sample.

Authors: Elisa, R.N. and Parris, B.A.

Journal: Cogn Neuropsychiatry

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 416-423

eISSN: 1464-0619

DOI: 10.1080/13546805.2015.1068687

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms are frequently linked to executive function deficits. There is reason to believe that these deficits may give rise to problems with complex reasoning and problem solving. METHODS: Eighty-six men (N = 45) and women (N = 41) completed a self-report measure to assess ADHD symptoms, along with a complex reasoning task; the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT). IQ was also tested due to its covariance with reasoning ability. RESULTS: Analysis suggested that all three symptoms of ADHD (inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity) are negatively related to performance on the CRT, however, only inattention significantly contributed to a model that predicted CRT performance. CONCLUSIONS: Of the three core symptoms of ADHD, inattention is the most important for reasoning ability. Results are discussed with reference to an executive function model of ADHD, with particular emphasis on the role of working memory in inattention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23336/

Source: PubMed

The relationship between core symptoms of ADHD and the Cognitive Reflection Test in a non-clinical sample

Authors: Elisa, R.N. and Parris, B.A.

Journal: COGNITIVE NEUROPSYCHIATRY

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 416-423

eISSN: 1464-0619

ISSN: 1354-6805

DOI: 10.1080/13546805.2015.1068687

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23336/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

The relationship between core symptoms of ADHD and the Cognitive Reflection Test in a non-clinical sample.

Authors: Elisa, R.N. and Parris, B.A.

Journal: Cognitive neuropsychiatry

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 416-423

eISSN: 1464-0619

ISSN: 1354-6805

DOI: 10.1080/13546805.2015.1068687

Abstract:

Introduction

Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms are frequently linked to executive function deficits. There is reason to believe that these deficits may give rise to problems with complex reasoning and problem solving.

Methods

Eighty-six men (N = 45) and women (N = 41) completed a self-report measure to assess ADHD symptoms, along with a complex reasoning task; the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT). IQ was also tested due to its covariance with reasoning ability.

Results

Analysis suggested that all three symptoms of ADHD (inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity) are negatively related to performance on the CRT, however, only inattention significantly contributed to a model that predicted CRT performance.

Conclusions

Of the three core symptoms of ADHD, inattention is the most important for reasoning ability. Results are discussed with reference to an executive function model of ADHD, with particular emphasis on the role of working memory in inattention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23336/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

The relationship between core symptoms of ADHD and the Cognitive Reflection Test in a non-clinical sample.

Authors: Elisa, R. and Parris, B.

Journal: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 416-423

ISSN: 1354-6805

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms are frequently linked to executive function deficits. There is reason to believe that these deficits may give rise to problems with complex reasoning and problem solving. METHODS: Eighty-six men (N = 45) and women (N = 41) completed a self-report measure to assess ADHD symptoms, along with a complex reasoning task; the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT). IQ was also tested due to its covariance with reasoning ability. RESULTS: Analysis suggested that all three symptoms of ADHD (inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity) are negatively related to performance on the CRT, however, only inattention significantly contributed to a model that predicted CRT performance. CONCLUSIONS: Of the three core symptoms of ADHD, inattention is the most important for reasoning ability. Results are discussed with reference to an executive function model of ADHD, with particular emphasis on the role of working memory in inattention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23336/

Source: BURO EPrints